Pensioner used metal detector to find suspected bomb in Bexley garden

This Is Local London: Mr Marriott has been evacuated from his house and is not allowed back in until the site has been cleared Mr Marriott has been evacuated from his house and is not allowed back in until the site has been cleared

A PENSIONER who dug up a suspected world war bomb in his garden says he found it with his metal detector.

John Marriott of Venture Close, Bexley discovered the metal object in his garden last night (March 27) when he was digging in his garden.

But the 75-year-old did not tell police about his find until this morning because he “did not want to make a fuss.”

Officers arrived at around 9.30am this morning.

Bexley Police's Inspector Colin Edge said: “A member of the public has found a suspected old world war bomb in their garden.

“We are getting an expert to assess it. We have evacuated the area and put closures up as a precaution.

“A metal object was found underground and we do not believe it to be a pipe.”

Mr Marriott has been evacuated from his house and is not allowed back in until the site has been cleared.

Mr Marriot said: “It makes a change to the day digging up a bomb.

“It’s at least eight to 10ft long.”

He discovered the suspected bomb around 7.30pm yesterday evening.

He said: “I’ve got block paving in my garden and it was a bit uneven and I wondered why so decided to investigate.

“I got my metal detector out and put it over the paving and two places picked up readings.

“So I started digging.

“I thought ‘This is a funny place to put a water main’.

“But when I uncovered it, I found a long metal object.”

Mr Marriott, who was a sapper in the Royal Engineers from 1955 until 1965, says he recognised the metal object as a bomb from his time in the army.

He said: “I was in the army for 10 years and am used to going out and blowing up bombs.

“I knew it was a bomb by its black painted surface.

“The earth is from the London docks and it must have been dumped there with it.”

The grandfather added: “It is 14inch from the house.

“I’m going to ask Bexley Council to do a survey of the area to find out if there are any more.”

Elmwood Drive, leading into Nurchison Avenue remain closed.

Comments (15)

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12:16pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Carparkattendant says...

No German WW11 bomb was 8-10ft long. The V1 and V2 rockets were painted green. And how could a 8-10ft long unexploded bomb be loaded onto a lorry and carted from the docks to Bexley without being noticed?
No German WW11 bomb was 8-10ft long. The V1 and V2 rockets were painted green. And how could a 8-10ft long unexploded bomb be loaded onto a lorry and carted from the docks to Bexley without being noticed? Carparkattendant

12:44pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Carparkattendant says...

I reckon it is a WW11 German submarine that came up the river at the back of his house and got stranded at low tide.
I reckon it is a WW11 German submarine that came up the river at the back of his house and got stranded at low tide. Carparkattendant

12:44pm Wed 28 Mar 12

the wall says...

“I’m going to ask Bexley Council to do a survey of the area to find out if there are any more.”

Yeah that's going to happen.
“I’m going to ask Bexley Council to do a survey of the area to find out if there are any more.” Yeah that's going to happen. the wall

12:50pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Carparkattendant says...

Or an old Polish burial site where they kept their scrap metal !
Or an old Polish burial site where they kept their scrap metal ! Carparkattendant

1:11pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Carparkattendant says...

Has anyone read Stephen King's book 'Tommyknockers'? Have his teeth started falling out yet?
Has anyone read Stephen King's book 'Tommyknockers'? Have his teeth started falling out yet? Carparkattendant

1:33pm Wed 28 Mar 12

gemmy says...

the wall wrote:
“I’m going to ask Bexley Council to do a survey of the area to find out if there are any more.”

Yeah that's going to happen.
There are quite a lot of unexploded bombs in and around Bexley. It would be quite an untaking to survey the whole borough.
[quote][p][bold]the wall[/bold] wrote: “I’m going to ask Bexley Council to do a survey of the area to find out if there are any more.” Yeah that's going to happen.[/p][/quote]There are quite a lot of unexploded bombs in and around Bexley. It would be quite an untaking to survey the whole borough. gemmy

1:51pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Corey69 says...

Carparkattendant wrote:
No German WW11 bomb was 8-10ft long. The V1 and V2 rockets were painted green. And how could a 8-10ft long unexploded bomb be loaded onto a lorry and carted from the docks to Bexley without being noticed?
Sir you are in fact wrong, I'm ex Royal Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal. The Germans in the second world war did in fact have a Large aircraft bomb called the SC1800, code name "Satan" It weighed 1800kg/3968lbs and was 13 feet 3 inches long and 2 feet 3 inches in diameter. It was carried by the Heinkel HE111. The V1 and V2 were painted in a disruptive pattern and in later years some of the V1's were painted a sky blue, this was believed to make them harder to see by pilots in spitfires trying to "wingtip" them to send them off course. For £10, if anyone is interested, Bexley Council will sell you a 1945 "bomb Plot" map. Have a nice Day :-)
[quote][p][bold]Carparkattendant[/bold] wrote: No German WW11 bomb was 8-10ft long. The V1 and V2 rockets were painted green. And how could a 8-10ft long unexploded bomb be loaded onto a lorry and carted from the docks to Bexley without being noticed?[/p][/quote]Sir you are in fact wrong, I'm ex Royal Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal. The Germans in the second world war did in fact have a Large aircraft bomb called the SC1800, code name "Satan" It weighed 1800kg/3968lbs and was 13 feet 3 inches long and 2 feet 3 inches in diameter. It was carried by the Heinkel HE111. The V1 and V2 were painted in a disruptive pattern and in later years some of the V1's were painted a sky blue, this was believed to make them harder to see by pilots in spitfires trying to "wingtip" them to send them off course. For £10, if anyone is interested, Bexley Council will sell you a 1945 "bomb Plot" map. Have a nice Day :-) Corey69

1:57pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Jeepo12 says...

Well just to be on the safe side I've got me tin foil hat on and the chin strap fastened tight too.

Don't panic.
Well just to be on the safe side I've got me tin foil hat on and the chin strap fastened tight too. Don't panic. Jeepo12

2:07pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Carparkattendant says...

Corey69 wrote:
Carparkattendant wrote:
No German WW11 bomb was 8-10ft long. The V1 and V2 rockets were painted green. And how could a 8-10ft long unexploded bomb be loaded onto a lorry and carted from the docks to Bexley without being noticed?
Sir you are in fact wrong, I'm ex Royal Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal. The Germans in the second world war did in fact have a Large aircraft bomb called the SC1800, code name "Satan" It weighed 1800kg/3968lbs and was 13 feet 3 inches long and 2 feet 3 inches in diameter. It was carried by the Heinkel HE111. The V1 and V2 were painted in a disruptive pattern and in later years some of the V1's were painted a sky blue, this was believed to make them harder to see by pilots in spitfires trying to "wingtip" them to send them off course. For £10, if anyone is interested, Bexley Council will sell you a 1945 "bomb Plot" map. Have a nice Day :-)
SC 1800 & SC 1800B
Type: General Purpose
Over-all Length: 147.9 in.; (B) 137.7 in.
Body Length: 107 in.; (B) 106 in.
Body Diameter: 26 in.; (B) 26 in.
Wall Thickness: 0.5 in.; (B) 0.5 in.
Tail Length: 55.2 in.; (B) 44.7 in.
Tail Width 36.0 in.; (B) 26.0 in.
Filling: 40/60 Amatol, TNT, and Trialen 105
Fuzing: 28B; (B) 28B or 25B
Color: Sky blue over-all with a yellow stripe on the tail cone.
Construction:
The SC 1800-kg. bomb has the same general construction as the SC 1000 and SC 1200 series. It is fitted with a single fuze pocket.
The tail unit is constructed of sheet steel. The four fins are braced with diagonal bars on the SC 1800B model. The SC 1800 series has the central TNT exploder tube like the SC 1000.

Suspension:
Horizontal, using the H-Type suspension lug.

Remarks:
If filled with Trialen 105, the following will be stenciled on the case.
"105" "Bei Abwurf auf land nicht im tiefangrift und nur o. V." (Not to be released from a low height on land targets; always nondelay).

Note the colour, also if it is a bomb this large it was probably aimed at the Vickers factory Crayford and either missed target or was jettisoned. But still unlikely to finish up at such a shallow depth and un-noticed and someone built a bungalow 14" from it.
[quote][p][bold]Corey69[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carparkattendant[/bold] wrote: No German WW11 bomb was 8-10ft long. The V1 and V2 rockets were painted green. And how could a 8-10ft long unexploded bomb be loaded onto a lorry and carted from the docks to Bexley without being noticed?[/p][/quote]Sir you are in fact wrong, I'm ex Royal Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal. The Germans in the second world war did in fact have a Large aircraft bomb called the SC1800, code name "Satan" It weighed 1800kg/3968lbs and was 13 feet 3 inches long and 2 feet 3 inches in diameter. It was carried by the Heinkel HE111. The V1 and V2 were painted in a disruptive pattern and in later years some of the V1's were painted a sky blue, this was believed to make them harder to see by pilots in spitfires trying to "wingtip" them to send them off course. For £10, if anyone is interested, Bexley Council will sell you a 1945 "bomb Plot" map. Have a nice Day :-)[/p][/quote]SC 1800 & SC 1800B Type: General Purpose Over-all Length: 147.9 in.; (B) 137.7 in. Body Length: 107 in.; (B) 106 in. Body Diameter: 26 in.; (B) 26 in. Wall Thickness: 0.5 in.; (B) 0.5 in. Tail Length: 55.2 in.; (B) 44.7 in. Tail Width 36.0 in.; (B) 26.0 in. Filling: 40/60 Amatol, TNT, and Trialen 105 Fuzing: 28B; (B) 28B or 25B Color: Sky blue over-all with a yellow stripe on the tail cone. Construction: The SC 1800-kg. bomb has the same general construction as the SC 1000 and SC 1200 series. It is fitted with a single fuze pocket. The tail unit is constructed of sheet steel. The four fins are braced with diagonal bars on the SC 1800B model. The SC 1800 series has the central TNT exploder tube like the SC 1000. Suspension: Horizontal, using the H-Type suspension lug. Remarks: If filled with Trialen 105, the following will be stenciled on the case. "105" "Bei Abwurf auf land nicht im tiefangrift und nur o. V." (Not to be released from a low height on land targets; always nondelay). Note the colour, also if it is a bomb this large it was probably aimed at the Vickers factory Crayford and either missed target or was jettisoned. But still unlikely to finish up at such a shallow depth and un-noticed and someone built a bungalow 14" from it. Carparkattendant

2:19pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Corey69 says...

Please before further comment about shallow bombs look up the term "J-curve" and what this can do to an aircraft bomb when dropped into the earth. As regards its location to the house I can't comment but would think the idea it was deliberately moved there may be a little far fetched, If the area during war time was designated a bomb grave yard, items placed there ready for disposal, then maybe.
Please before further comment about shallow bombs look up the term "J-curve" and what this can do to an aircraft bomb when dropped into the earth. As regards its location to the house I can't comment but would think the idea it was deliberately moved there may be a little far fetched, If the area during war time was designated a bomb grave yard, items placed there ready for disposal, then maybe. Corey69

2:24pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Carparkattendant says...

Corey69 wrote:
Please before further comment about shallow bombs look up the term "J-curve" and what this can do to an aircraft bomb when dropped into the earth. As regards its location to the house I can't comment but would think the idea it was deliberately moved there may be a little far fetched, If the area during war time was designated a bomb grave yard, items placed there ready for disposal, then maybe.
Know about J-curves. A bomb fell at the junction of Woodlands Road/Worlds End Lane Chelsfield that is still there and could never be found.
[quote][p][bold]Corey69[/bold] wrote: Please before further comment about shallow bombs look up the term "J-curve" and what this can do to an aircraft bomb when dropped into the earth. As regards its location to the house I can't comment but would think the idea it was deliberately moved there may be a little far fetched, If the area during war time was designated a bomb grave yard, items placed there ready for disposal, then maybe.[/p][/quote]Know about J-curves. A bomb fell at the junction of Woodlands Road/Worlds End Lane Chelsfield that is still there and could never be found. Carparkattendant

2:25pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Carparkattendant says...

I said it was Polish scrap metal!
I said it was Polish scrap metal! Carparkattendant

2:28pm Wed 28 Mar 12

Corey69 says...

So you are well aware that bombs can indeed be that shallow? Many I have dealt with I have found nose up due to J-Curve, and not very deep. Will investigate above info, thank you.
So you are well aware that bombs can indeed be that shallow? Many I have dealt with I have found nose up due to J-Curve, and not very deep. Will investigate above info, thank you. Corey69

4:00pm Wed 28 Mar 12

the wall says...

gemmy wrote:
the wall wrote: “I’m going to ask Bexley Council to do a survey of the area to find out if there are any more.” Yeah that's going to happen.
There are quite a lot of unexploded bombs in and around Bexley. It would be quite an untaking to survey the whole borough.
" quite an untaking to survey the whole borough".


That's my point.
[quote][p][bold]gemmy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]the wall[/bold] wrote: “I’m going to ask Bexley Council to do a survey of the area to find out if there are any more.” Yeah that's going to happen.[/p][/quote]There are quite a lot of unexploded bombs in and around Bexley. It would be quite an untaking to survey the whole borough.[/p][/quote]" quite an untaking to survey the whole borough". That's my point. the wall

8:20pm Wed 28 Mar 12

bizzymum says...

Ummmm..........NS Update (Breaking News) it was a bit of scrap metal. Carparkattendant you were right. Just a bit of old pipe. Not sure I needed all the dimensions though. That made me a bit sleepy. Nighty night!
Ummmm..........NS Update (Breaking News) it was a bit of scrap metal. Carparkattendant you were right. Just a bit of old pipe. Not sure I needed all the dimensions though. That made me a bit sleepy. Nighty night! bizzymum

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