This Is Local London£85m college for young offenders (From This Is Local London)

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£85m college for young offenders

This Is Local London: An artist's impression of a planned 'secure college' for young offenders (Ministry of Justice/PA) An artist's impression of a planned 'secure college' for young offenders (Ministry of Justice/PA)

A "secure college" for young offenders will put "education at the heart of custody", the Justice Secretary has said as the first images of the £85 million facility were unveiled.

Chris Grayling said the college, which will house up to 320 young offenders aged between 12 and 17 in Leicestershire, will be a "step change" from the environment of "bars on windows" and provide a major boost to the local economy.

A head teacher or principal will lead a team of educational professionals and offender managers at the secure college, which will feature modern living blocks to accommodate the inmates.

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has announced that construction firm Wates will build the facility next to Glen Parva Youth Offenders Institute (YOI) in Leicestershire, with work starting next year ahead of a 2017 opening.

Labour has urged ministers to scrap the proposal from the Criminal Justice and Court Bill, while backbencher John McDonnell claimed the site would be an "Oakwood for children" and risk riots and assaults.

Mr Grayling said: "The development of a secure college is a pioneering approach to tackling the reoffending rates of young people, putting education at the heart of custody.

"This will give them a far better chance of getting out of the criminal justice system, and will mean much better value for money than just continuing to lock up the same young people time and again.

"It's right that young offenders should face appropriate punishment, including custody for the most serious or persistent offences. But the new secure college will be a step change from the traditional environment of bars on windows.

"It will help in our fight to tackle the root cause of offending and give young offenders the skills and self-discipline they need to gain employment or training upon release.

"This project will bring major benefits to the economy and indeed to the local community in the long-term."

The secure college will serve young offenders from the Midlands and the East of England, though offenders from other areas could also be taken.

Wates has committed to ensuring that three quarters of all sub-contractor work will go to local companies within 50 miles of the secure college, the MoJ said

Meanwhile, 70% of all appointments will be to small and medium enterprises (SMEs), it added.

Wates will create 32 apprenticeships and 30 new jobs during construction, as well as 24 work placements for local schoolchildren, the MoJ said.

In 2012/13, 2,780 young people were sentenced to immediate custody. There were 1,271 young people in youth custody in England and Wales at the end of March.

Currently, almost seven in ten young offenders return to crime when they are released, according to the MoJ.

The youth custodial estate currently consists of YOIs, Secure Training Centres and Secure Children's Homes. The average cost of a place in youth custody is around £100,000 per annum.

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6:07pm Sun 8 Jun 14

varteg1 says...

Ah!....the return if the old Approved School / Borstal Institution eh?

Eton for naughty boys (and girls I guess).
Ah!....the return if the old Approved School / Borstal Institution eh? Eton for naughty boys (and girls I guess). varteg1
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6:11pm Sun 8 Jun 14

varteg1 says...

Not to forget,, those were dispensed with many years ago as being deemed training academies for crooks.

And closed by a predecessor Tory government as I recall.
Not to forget,, those were dispensed with many years ago as being deemed training academies for crooks. And closed by a predecessor Tory government as I recall. varteg1
  • Score: 0

1:14am Mon 9 Jun 14

elfinia says...

I think it's good to bring "borstals" back. Someone I know who grew up in Camden, London in the days when it was a really deprived area , killed another young man in a fight ( he knocked him down a flight of stairs ). As a teenager he spent several years in Borstal where he received a good education and learnt a trade.On release he was able to earn a living which he still does to this day.....and left his life of crime behind.

These places don't only help the criminals not to re-offend, they also spare the potential future victims.
I think it's good to bring "borstals" back. Someone I know who grew up in Camden, London in the days when it was a really deprived area , killed another young man in a fight ( he knocked him down a flight of stairs ). As a teenager he spent several years in Borstal where he received a good education and learnt a trade.On release he was able to earn a living which he still does to this day.....and left his life of crime behind. These places don't only help the criminals not to re-offend, they also spare the potential future victims. elfinia
  • Score: 0

8:35am Mon 9 Jun 14

varteg1 says...

elfinia wrote:
I think it's good to bring "borstals" back. Someone I know who grew up in Camden, London in the days when it was a really deprived area , killed another young man in a fight ( he knocked him down a flight of stairs ). As a teenager he spent several years in Borstal where he received a good education and learnt a trade.On release he was able to earn a living which he still does to this day.....and left his life of crime behind.

These places don't only help the criminals not to re-offend, they also spare the potential future victims.
How about treating the problems in advance,

A bit late in the day when the youth has committed whatever crime he/she is sent down for.

If the state thinks a youth can be educated...by force... maybe it should take a far more rigid approach in schooling overall, and give educators powers that rein in bad behaviour.
And then the matter of training and apprenticeships, why not ensure that such is given in the work place, far cheaper than in an institution, another reason given for closing down those institutions far too costly.

An apprentice, or trainee earns a wage in the workplace and produces, whilst in work, un unlikely scenario whilst incarcerated in an institute.

I recall a newspaper article from the 70's that stated it cost a 150 pounds a week to keep a boy in an approved school, whereas an apprentice was funded at around twenty pounds a week.
That would be ten or more times that today. If the state wants value for money I suggest from historical data, opening up such places is hardly able ty do that.
It was also a common complaint about such places, that many came out better trained in criminal knowledge and behaviour than when they went in.
[quote][p][bold]elfinia[/bold] wrote: I think it's good to bring "borstals" back. Someone I know who grew up in Camden, London in the days when it was a really deprived area , killed another young man in a fight ( he knocked him down a flight of stairs ). As a teenager he spent several years in Borstal where he received a good education and learnt a trade.On release he was able to earn a living which he still does to this day.....and left his life of crime behind. These places don't only help the criminals not to re-offend, they also spare the potential future victims.[/p][/quote]How about treating the problems in advance, A bit late in the day when the youth has committed whatever crime he/she is sent down for. If the state thinks a youth can be educated...by force... maybe it should take a far more rigid approach in schooling overall, and give educators powers that rein in bad behaviour. And then the matter of training and apprenticeships, why not ensure that such is given in the work place, far cheaper than in an institution, another reason given for closing down those institutions far too costly. An apprentice, or trainee earns a wage in the workplace and produces, whilst in work, un unlikely scenario whilst incarcerated in an institute. I recall a newspaper article from the 70's that stated it cost a 150 pounds a week to keep a boy in an approved school, whereas an apprentice was funded at around twenty pounds a week. That would be ten or more times that today. If the state wants value for money I suggest from historical data, opening up such places is hardly able ty do that. It was also a common complaint about such places, that many came out better trained in criminal knowledge and behaviour than when they went in. varteg1
  • Score: 0

10:50am Mon 9 Jun 14

MICHAELJCARPENTER2003@YAHOO.CO.UK says...

THEY DID NOT WANT TO LEARN IN SCHOOL WHAT MAKES YOU THINK THEY WILL WANT TO LEARN THERE.
THEY DID NOT WANT TO LEARN IN SCHOOL WHAT MAKES YOU THINK THEY WILL WANT TO LEARN THERE. MICHAELJCARPENTER2003@YAHOO.CO.UK
  • Score: 0
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