On this date in Watford FC's history

This Is Local London: On this date in Watford FC's history On this date in Watford FC's history

Saturday, December 8, 1973

Captain Dennis Bond's decision to kick into a strong wind proved crucial as Watford entertained Charlton Athletic in the third division.

By the time the Hornets had the wind behind them they were three down, Leo Markham having failed to cope with the attentions of future Hornet Arthur Horsfield.

Pat Morrissey's consolation was set up by Stewart Scullion, making his second debut for the club having re-joined from Sheffield United the previous week.

Reproduced by kind permission of Matt Rowson from his book, Watford FC On This Day

Comments (3)

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12:18pm Mon 9 Dec 13

MainStandShambles says...

I remember this game, as maybe some of our other 'more mature' fans do.
I'm sure i've got the programme for this match, along with the other thousand or so that i bought during a long apprenticeship on the Vicarage Road terrace.

A pint in the town, a warm pie from a chippy in Market Street then shuffle through a turnstile onto the only terrace in the country that you walked down onto from the gate. Meeting up with my football mate between the flag pole and the goal and the smell of Old Holborn wafting over the terrace. These articles really bring back the memories.

Goal kicks didn't reach the halfway line during the first half that afternoon and we were flattered to be only 3 nil down at the break. I felt sorry for Leo Markham to be honest.

Unfortunately Arthur Horsfield couldn't replicate his scoring record after he signed for us but he always had time for the fans when you spoke to him.
He earned the nickname 'Dobbin' for his very unusual running style.

It's quite sobering thinking of matches like this, they were quite often the norm and we have witnessed many of them over the years but we didn't go home thinking 'sack the manager' we just willed him into bringing about an improvement next time round. In these days when instant gratification is demanded on the pitch maybe we've lost some of the peripheral enjoyment we used to experience.

Don't mind me folks, i couldn't resist the ramble down Memory Lane.
I remember this game, as maybe some of our other 'more mature' fans do. I'm sure i've got the programme for this match, along with the other thousand or so that i bought during a long apprenticeship on the Vicarage Road terrace. A pint in the town, a warm pie from a chippy in Market Street then shuffle through a turnstile onto the only terrace in the country that you walked down onto from the gate. Meeting up with my football mate between the flag pole and the goal and the smell of Old Holborn wafting over the terrace. These articles really bring back the memories. Goal kicks didn't reach the halfway line during the first half that afternoon and we were flattered to be only 3 nil down at the break. I felt sorry for Leo Markham to be honest. Unfortunately Arthur Horsfield couldn't replicate his scoring record after he signed for us but he always had time for the fans when you spoke to him. He earned the nickname 'Dobbin' for his very unusual running style. It's quite sobering thinking of matches like this, they were quite often the norm and we have witnessed many of them over the years but we didn't go home thinking 'sack the manager' we just willed him into bringing about an improvement next time round. In these days when instant gratification is demanded on the pitch maybe we've lost some of the peripheral enjoyment we used to experience. Don't mind me folks, i couldn't resist the ramble down Memory Lane. MainStandShambles

5:44pm Mon 9 Dec 13

CheshamMike60 says...

Was this the game where everyone except a Charlton player thought the ball was going out for a goal-kick? In fact it was held up by the wind so, as our defence advanced upfield for the goal-kick, his anticipation was rewarded with a freakish goal. I remember the game was against Charlton; can anyone confirm it was this one?
I thought Horsfield got his nickname from the 'horse' part of his name and the fact that he was not the quickest.
Was this the game where everyone except a Charlton player thought the ball was going out for a goal-kick? In fact it was held up by the wind so, as our defence advanced upfield for the goal-kick, his anticipation was rewarded with a freakish goal. I remember the game was against Charlton; can anyone confirm it was this one? I thought Horsfield got his nickname from the 'horse' part of his name and the fact that he was not the quickest. CheshamMike60

7:31pm Mon 9 Dec 13

MainStandShambles says...

I'd forgotten that incident with the ball being held up in the wind CheshamMike60 but whether it was this particular match i don't know.

As for Horsfield's nickname i remember some wag in the crowd shouting 'go on Dobbin' when he was loping after a long ball forward with his head going backwards and forwards like a horse heading for the finishing line and somebody else said 'well he's got the right name to be a Dobbin' and it just stuck. It certainly caused a great deal of laughter.
I'd forgotten that incident with the ball being held up in the wind CheshamMike60 but whether it was this particular match i don't know. As for Horsfield's nickname i remember some wag in the crowd shouting 'go on Dobbin' when he was loping after a long ball forward with his head going backwards and forwards like a horse heading for the finishing line and somebody else said 'well he's got the right name to be a Dobbin' and it just stuck. It certainly caused a great deal of laughter. MainStandShambles

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