Man cut out of BMW after crash in Cox Lane, Chessington

The BMW with part of its roof cut away

The BMW with part of its roof cut away

First published in News
Last updated
This Is Local London: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

A man believed to be in his 20's was cut out of a BMW this afternoon, after crashing in Cox Lane, Chessington.

The incident happened around 12:45pm.

Fire fighters from Surbiton station and a London Air Ambulance attended the scene.

More to follow.

Did you see the incident? Do you know what happened? Call the news desk on 0208 722 6358, or email tom.gillespie@london.newsquest.co.uk

Comments (2)

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9:24pm Sun 10 Aug 14

JohnTheEngineer says...

The image on this page appears to be in Jubilee Way rather than Cox Lane.

Lot of damage for a 30 mph accident
The image on this page appears to be in Jubilee Way rather than Cox Lane. Lot of damage for a 30 mph accident JohnTheEngineer
  • Score: -1

12:50pm Mon 11 Aug 14

AlphaEcho says...

"Lot of damage for a 30 mph accident"

A lot of the damage seen on the photograph will have occurred as a result of the process of extricating the driver.

Fire crews will work in close co-operation with the Ambulance service to determine the safest way in which to remove a casualty from a motor vehicle. The Ambulance service will identify the possible injuries due to the nature of the accident and from examining \ talking to the casualty. They will then inform the fire crews as to the way that they would like to remove the casualty; the Fire Service will then carry out the necessary operations to achieve that. This may involve (but isn’t limited to) a total roof removal, a partial roof removal (i.e. flapping the roof back as appears in the photograph) or removal of doors and centre posts or a combination of any of these.

When people are said to have been cut free from the vehicle it doesn’t always mean that they have been physically trapped due to deformation of the vehicle, this is much rarer these days due to the safety standards of modern vehicles. People are now more likely to be trapped by the nature of their injuries, i.e. neck, back or pelvic pain. Normally caused by the rapid deceleration of the vehicle and its occupants.

Damage to the vehicle always seems extreme but it is done purely to protect the casualty from any further injuries and to enable those carrying out the rescue to do so in a safe and controlled manner.

It is always better to put all these precautions in place rather than have a casualty removed from a vehicle without doing so as an undiagnosed neck or spinal injury could prove fatal or could paralyse someone for life and all for the sake of taking a few extra precautions. Hence the use of neck collars and spinal boards on virtually every occasion and it’s almost impossible to use a full length spinal board on a car that still has its roof in place. Cars can be replaced but it’s never worth risking someone’s life purely for the sake of a vehicle. It always looks far worse than it is, but cutting a vehicle like this is done to protect all those involved.
"Lot of damage for a 30 mph accident" A lot of the damage seen on the photograph will have occurred as a result of the process of extricating the driver. Fire crews will work in close co-operation with the Ambulance service to determine the safest way in which to remove a casualty from a motor vehicle. The Ambulance service will identify the possible injuries due to the nature of the accident and from examining \ talking to the casualty. They will then inform the fire crews as to the way that they would like to remove the casualty; the Fire Service will then carry out the necessary operations to achieve that. This may involve (but isn’t limited to) a total roof removal, a partial roof removal (i.e. flapping the roof back as appears in the photograph) or removal of doors and centre posts or a combination of any of these. When people are said to have been cut free from the vehicle it doesn’t always mean that they have been physically trapped due to deformation of the vehicle, this is much rarer these days due to the safety standards of modern vehicles. People are now more likely to be trapped by the nature of their injuries, i.e. neck, back or pelvic pain. Normally caused by the rapid deceleration of the vehicle and its occupants. Damage to the vehicle always seems extreme but it is done purely to protect the casualty from any further injuries and to enable those carrying out the rescue to do so in a safe and controlled manner. It is always better to put all these precautions in place rather than have a casualty removed from a vehicle without doing so as an undiagnosed neck or spinal injury could prove fatal or could paralyse someone for life and all for the sake of taking a few extra precautions. Hence the use of neck collars and spinal boards on virtually every occasion and it’s almost impossible to use a full length spinal board on a car that still has its roof in place. Cars can be replaced but it’s never worth risking someone’s life purely for the sake of a vehicle. It always looks far worse than it is, but cutting a vehicle like this is done to protect all those involved. AlphaEcho
  • Score: 23

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