Former police officer to be charged with murder of Azelle Rodney, in Edgware,

Former police officer charged with murder

Former police officer charged with murder

First published in News
Last updated
This Is Local London: Photograph of the Author by , Senior Reporter

A former firearms officer will face prosecution for the murder of a man shot dead during a police operation.

Azelle Rodney was killed by the police marksman in Edgware in 2005 after officers stopped the car he was travelling in, believing he was on his way to carry out an armed robbery.

The officer is only known as E7 after he was granted anonymity during a public inquiry into the death of the 24-year-old, in Hale Lane.

After the three-month inquiry, the Independent Police Complaints Commission re-referred the incident to the Crown Prosecution service with new evidence.

Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders said: "We have carefully considered the new file of evidence submitted to us and have decided that a former Metropolitan Police officer, currently identified only as E7, will be prosecuted for murder.

She added: "The decision to prosecute was taken in accordance with the code for crown prosecutors.

“We have determined that there is a realistic prospect of conviction and that a prosecution is in the public interest.”

Reacting to the announcment, Mr Rodney's mother Susan Alexander said: "I am very pleased at the CPS's decision to prosecute the officer who killed my son.

"I have waited a long time to see this day and hope this prosecution will lead to justice for Azelle."

However she said she was disappointed the Metropolitan Police Commissioner would not face prosecution over the planning of the operation.

She said: "Whilst I am disappointed at the decision not to prosecute the commissioner in relation to the failures which were found by Sir Christopher Holland regarding the planning and control of the operation, his report makes clear that there were significant failures on the part of the Metropolitan Police and we deserve an immediate and unreserved apology for those failures."

Mr Rodney was killed almost instantly when he was struck by six bullets fired by a police marksman seconds after an unmarked car pulled up alongside the car he was travelling in.

The public enquiry led by Sir Christopher Holland, found police had "no lawful justification" for the shooting.

In a statement the Metropolitan Police said: "As criminal proceedings are now active, it would be inappropriate to comment further on this case at this time.

"The MPS runs firearms operations daily to take guns off the streets. Our officers are highly-trained and professional and fire shots only once or twice a year.

“We accept that where this happens, our officers will be subject to detailed scrutiny.

"We keep our firearms tactics constantly under review and have accepted the recommendations made by the public inquiry into Azelle Rodney's death."

Comments (6)

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8:44am Thu 31 Jul 14

SeaBee says...

Better lock him up now without a trial because if he is found not guilty the looters and rioters will return.
Better lock him up now without a trial because if he is found not guilty the looters and rioters will return. SeaBee
  • Score: 0

4:13am Fri 1 Aug 14

DJFearRoss says...

It's a sad story to hear about anyone being killed. But is it me or are there some important details that seem to be getting missed from this story?

Did Azelle Rodney have a criminal record? Did they find guns in the vehicle?
Was he involved in gangs / drug supply? Did the officer believe his life was in danger? The list goes on....

Obviously someone doesn't want us to know all facts and wants to portray another side to this story.
It's a sad story to hear about anyone being killed. But is it me or are there some important details that seem to be getting missed from this story? Did Azelle Rodney have a criminal record? Did they find guns in the vehicle? Was he involved in gangs / drug supply? Did the officer believe his life was in danger? The list goes on.... Obviously someone doesn't want us to know all facts and wants to portray another side to this story. DJFearRoss
  • Score: 5

2:27pm Fri 1 Aug 14

Sonoo Malkani says...

You might have noticed that this unfortunate incident occurred in 2005,pointing to the enormous complexities encountered in this case.It must have been a terrible shock for the mother ,family and friends of the Mr Azelle Rodney,who died from six bullets fired at him.They have waited over a decade to receive justice.

I hope Rodney's mother,Susan Alexander will find comfort in the fact that only a genuine investigation has led to the possibility of a prosecution against firearms officer E7.

I am sorry she feels the Commissioner himself is personally responsible and should also be prosecuted for failures in procedures followed.These things don't occur as most members of public simplistically imagine.It's far more complicated than we envisage.

Once the case has reached its conclusion I am sure The Commissioner's office will be in touch with her to do the needful.Any failures or mistakes will be addressed.The MPS is at pains to review their firearms tactics on an ongoing basis ---precisely because of the sensitive nature of these operations.They provide an excellent service, taking guns off our streets every single, to keep London safe.However,errors can and will occur from time to time. The MPS is keen to keep these to bare minimum.

It is re-assuring to hear that the MPS have already reviewed their firearms tactics and have incorporated recommendations made by Sir Christopher Holland who led the IPCC inquiry.

Conjecture about what really happened is futile and very misleading.
These incidents are complex and require much expertise to realistically uncover what might have transpired.

Working as a firearms officer is a HUGE responsibility and carries its own set of risks.Sometimes,a genuine error occurs, leading to tragic consequences,as has very sadly occurred on this occasion.This is not the norm.

The MPS usually only resort to firearms use once or twice a year,unlike in the USA.Of course,any unnecessary loss of life,is one too many and a heart-break all the same.The MPS also agonises over this.

Members of public(Londoners) know there are strict rules and regulations governing the use of firearms and have had the opportunity of monitoring training provided for these firearms officers.Our previous Borough Commander,Dal Babu,had arranged for some of us to see this in person.

The training is extremely demanding,highly professional ,rigorous and tightly regulated.Of course,nothing is 100% safe. Accidents may occur from time to time with tragic results,as seems to have happened here.

The matter was carefully investigated by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) .This is standard practice.After three months the IPCC found new evidence which was submitted to the Crown Prosecution Service.

The Director of Public Prosecutions,Alison Saunders,has clearly stated that it will be in the public interest to prosecute this former Firearms officer and has high hopes of getting a conviction.In the final analysis the Crown Court will give their verdict.We must be patient and wait to see what they decide.The chances of a conviction seem high.

I believe,in all fairness,that the Metropolitan Police Service,is not deliberately hiding facts/more details from us, as suggested by one reader but are NOT PERMITTED TO COMMENT when the case is still LIVE ---in other words,sub judice.!There are processes in place which must be adhered to very strictly.Even the "Law "must adhere to the Law.

Must wait patiently before we get a "result."
You might have noticed that this unfortunate incident occurred in 2005,pointing to the enormous complexities encountered in this case.It must have been a terrible shock for the mother ,family and friends of the Mr Azelle Rodney,who died from six bullets fired at him.They have waited over a decade to receive justice. I hope Rodney's mother,Susan Alexander will find comfort in the fact that only a genuine investigation has led to the possibility of a prosecution against firearms officer E7. I am sorry she feels the Commissioner himself is personally responsible and should also be prosecuted for failures in procedures followed.These things don't occur as most members of public simplistically imagine.It's far more complicated than we envisage. Once the case has reached its conclusion I am sure The Commissioner's office will be in touch with her to do the needful.Any failures or mistakes will be addressed.The MPS is at pains to review their firearms tactics on an ongoing basis ---precisely because of the sensitive nature of these operations.They provide an excellent service, taking guns off our streets every single, to keep London safe.However,errors can and will occur from time to time. The MPS is keen to keep these to bare minimum. It is re-assuring to hear that the MPS have already reviewed their firearms tactics and have incorporated recommendations made by Sir Christopher Holland who led the IPCC inquiry. Conjecture about what really happened is futile and very misleading. These incidents are complex and require much expertise to realistically uncover what might have transpired. Working as a firearms officer is a HUGE responsibility and carries its own set of risks.Sometimes,a genuine error occurs, leading to tragic consequences,as has very sadly occurred on this occasion.This is not the norm. The MPS usually only resort to firearms use once or twice a year,unlike in the USA.Of course,any unnecessary loss of life,is one too many and a heart-break all the same.The MPS also agonises over this. Members of public(Londoners) know there are strict rules and regulations governing the use of firearms and have had the opportunity of monitoring training provided for these firearms officers.Our previous Borough Commander,Dal Babu,had arranged for some of us to see this in person. The training is extremely demanding,highly professional ,rigorous and tightly regulated.Of course,nothing is 100% safe. Accidents may occur from time to time with tragic results,as seems to have happened here. The matter was carefully investigated by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) .This is standard practice.After three months the IPCC found new evidence which was submitted to the Crown Prosecution Service. The Director of Public Prosecutions,Alison Saunders,has clearly stated that it will be in the public interest to prosecute this former Firearms officer and has high hopes of getting a conviction.In the final analysis the Crown Court will give their verdict.We must be patient and wait to see what they decide.The chances of a conviction seem high. I believe,in all fairness,that the Metropolitan Police Service,is not deliberately hiding facts/more details from us, as suggested by one reader but are NOT PERMITTED TO COMMENT when the case is still LIVE ---in other words,sub judice.!There are processes in place which must be adhered to very strictly.Even the "Law "must adhere to the Law. Must wait patiently before we get a "result." Sonoo Malkani
  • Score: -7

4:35pm Sat 2 Aug 14

DJFearRoss says...

@Sonoo. I didn't ask that he actually calls up Harrow Times and asks to give his side of story. My question is why there are parts of the story missing? The side of the victim and his family has been put forward in the above news story but not that of the Police. Two sides to every story.
@Sonoo. I didn't ask that he actually calls up Harrow Times and asks to give his side of story. My question is why there are parts of the story missing? The side of the victim and his family has been put forward in the above news story but not that of the Police. Two sides to every story. DJFearRoss
  • Score: 4

10:52am Mon 4 Aug 14

Sonoo Malkani says...

Understood,DJ.The Police cannot comment since it's subjudice.
I know this seems terribly unfair but that's the way the cookie crumbles!

Harrow Times may have tried to get their angle on this but probably were told to wait for the Crown Court's decision.I expect rigorous scrutiny of the officer in question plus of ongoing firearms tactics and procedures are going on behind the scenes by the MPS.

They are required to protect the public so when a tragic incident like this occurs they look very carefully at improving and learning what lessons emerge.

I have attended many "GOLD meetings"---with several statutory partners,Community leaders,Councillors MPs and others called within a couple of hours by the local Borough Commander when incidents of any serious nature occur.A top cop ,From New Scotland Yard ,expert in dealing with these issues also attends,along with some one from Forensics to keep us updated.They ensure that re-assurance is provided for local citizens since they know how it must impact on ordinary folk.

Serious criminal proceedings must remain confidential until all the facts can be ascertained by professionals.Rest assured you will hear their side of the story once the Court has made its decision.

Until then,PATIENCE!
Understood,DJ.The Police cannot comment since it's subjudice. I know this seems terribly unfair but that's the way the cookie crumbles! Harrow Times may have tried to get their angle on this but probably were told to wait for the Crown Court's decision.I expect rigorous scrutiny of the officer in question plus of ongoing firearms tactics and procedures are going on behind the scenes by the MPS. They are required to protect the public so when a tragic incident like this occurs they look very carefully at improving and learning what lessons emerge. I have attended many "GOLD meetings"---with several statutory partners,Community leaders,Councillors MPs and others called within a couple of hours by the local Borough Commander when incidents of any serious nature occur.A top cop ,From New Scotland Yard ,expert in dealing with these issues also attends,along with some one from Forensics to keep us updated.They ensure that re-assurance is provided for local citizens since they know how it must impact on ordinary folk. Serious criminal proceedings must remain confidential until all the facts can be ascertained by professionals.Rest assured you will hear their side of the story once the Court has made its decision. Until then,PATIENCE! Sonoo Malkani
  • Score: -2

10:56am Mon 4 Aug 14

Sonoo Malkani says...

One other thing we have over-looked.The incident occurred in 2005.Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe was NOT the Metropolitan Police Commissioner at that time!

Of course,he will be required to comment as the man in the hot seat now and probably will.That too must wait till the Court has made its mind up.
One other thing we have over-looked.The incident occurred in 2005.Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe was NOT the Metropolitan Police Commissioner at that time! Of course,he will be required to comment as the man in the hot seat now and probably will.That too must wait till the Court has made its mind up. Sonoo Malkani
  • Score: -2

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