Strike action to affect schools and council services in Sutton

This Is Local London: Six separate unions are involved in today's strike action Six separate unions are involved in today's strike action

Schools are closed today and council services have been interrupted as workers take part in national strike action.

Six separate unions are involved in today's strike action with more than a million  workers - including teachers, firefighters and civil servants - protest against a range of disputes including pay, pensions, working conditions and spending cuts.

Waste collections have been suspended in Sutton but the council said it will prioritise brown and green wheelie bin collections tomorrow.

The Kimpton Park Way Reuse and Recycling Centre is scheduled to remain open but Cheam library, Wallington library, the Phoenix library and Beddington library are closed.

There are pickets outside the council's civic offices in St Nicholas Way and its base in Therapia Lane.

Sutton Council's deputy leader Councillor Colin Hall said: "“We value our staff who all do a tremendous job but as a council we have all had to tighten our belts, like every other local authority in the country.

"We've understood the impact on our own lowest paid staff and that’s why we’ve introducing the London Living Wage for them.

“We've recognised the pressure staff are under and that is why we've made a national pay offer of 1%.

"We have to be realistic. This is all local government can afford at a time when Sutton Council must find another £38m of savings.”

Emily Brother's Labour's prospective parliamentary candidate for Sutton and Cheam said she supports the strikes. 

She added: "I don’t want a strike, not least because of the impact on children and parents, service users and the wider public.

This Is Local London:

Emily Brothers (second from right) with Carol Shorter, Sheila Cox & Kirsty Robertson of Unison

“Sadly, public sector workers have little option other than strike action in light of the coalition’s austerity measures, as well as the way they have ill-treated the pay and conditions of employees, many working part-time and on low pay.

“Instead of ramping up the rhetoric, the Government should get round the table, because both sides have a responsibility to stop it happening.

"Sutton Council likewise needs to engage with all unions in a more constructive way."

Schools have also been affected with some closed and many partially open. Sutton's National Union of Teachers secretary Andy Gibbons said: "Michael Gove is presiding over an education system with thousands of teachers leaving the job early and families struggling to find a school place for their child.

"Constant changes to the curriculum and assessment without proper consultation, evidence or time are wearing teachers out and damaging children's education.

This Is Local London:

Teachers from Sutton on strike in London

"Teachers have seen the value of their pay go down and their working hours go up.

"Michael Gove is refusing to listen and so we have no choice but to take strike action again. We know many parents understand that we are standing up for education and that this strike is Michael Gove’s fault."

For information on whether your school is open, visit www.opencheck.atomwide.com

Comments (9)

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11:18am Thu 10 Jul 14

Niki R says...

Striking is never an easy choice, and many forced into withdrawing their labour after 4 years of appalling treatment from this Government cannot easily afford to lose pay. What's the Government's response? They are going to look at how they can further abuse our public sector workers by making it harder or impossible for them to take strike action. I stand with those who have been forced into this impossible situation and call on Tom Brake to grow a spine and recant his support for the abuse of these people.
Striking is never an easy choice, and many forced into withdrawing their labour after 4 years of appalling treatment from this Government cannot easily afford to lose pay. What's the Government's response? They are going to look at how they can further abuse our public sector workers by making it harder or impossible for them to take strike action. I stand with those who have been forced into this impossible situation and call on Tom Brake to grow a spine and recant his support for the abuse of these people. Niki R
  • Score: 6

12:10pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Bonnie Craven says...

No one takes a decision to strike lightly. A day on strike costs a day's wages and the people striking can ill afford this. As a teacher I can confirm that the NUT have been trying without success to have a discussion with Michael Gove about the real harm he is doing to our schools. Expecting more work for less pay is not acceptable. Demanding that the terms of a self-funded pension plan are changed represents a breech on contract and a mis-sold policy. Expecting teachers to stay in a job that is paying them increasingly less well, charging more for a pension for longer for a lower and shorter term of pay out are not things that can be afforded by our teachers.

We are rapidly approaching another crisis point where there will be a real shortage of teachers available as more and more experienced and good teachers are forced out of the job. This is in no one's interests. Already a large proportion of highly qualified teachers are leaving education after serving fewer years than their training took.

Expecting people to teach until they are 68 is unrealistic. Teaching is a technologically and physically demanding job where the safety and best interests of the children are not best served by people who are in their so called golden years.

Many other unions are striking today. I stand shoulder to shoulder with my brothers and sisters. Their sacrifices today are to secure a better future for us all.
No one takes a decision to strike lightly. A day on strike costs a day's wages and the people striking can ill afford this. As a teacher I can confirm that the NUT have been trying without success to have a discussion with Michael Gove about the real harm he is doing to our schools. Expecting more work for less pay is not acceptable. Demanding that the terms of a self-funded pension plan are changed represents a breech on contract and a mis-sold policy. Expecting teachers to stay in a job that is paying them increasingly less well, charging more for a pension for longer for a lower and shorter term of pay out are not things that can be afforded by our teachers. We are rapidly approaching another crisis point where there will be a real shortage of teachers available as more and more experienced and good teachers are forced out of the job. This is in no one's interests. Already a large proportion of highly qualified teachers are leaving education after serving fewer years than their training took. Expecting people to teach until they are 68 is unrealistic. Teaching is a technologically and physically demanding job where the safety and best interests of the children are not best served by people who are in their so called golden years. Many other unions are striking today. I stand shoulder to shoulder with my brothers and sisters. Their sacrifices today are to secure a better future for us all. Bonnie Craven
  • Score: 7

2:32pm Thu 10 Jul 14

alroutemaster says...

As an ex-public service employee myself I have only one message for these strikers; you are being misled by your union masters into taking part in what is nothing less than a political strike. There is never an overall vote in favour of a strike, it's just the socialist militants, which was a major reason why I refused to join the union. I can assure you all that the pension will be good when you retire and you have, until recently, paid virtually nothing for it yourself. Think of those pensioners and others who are, and will be, worse off than yourselves and get back to work........
As an ex-public service employee myself I have only one message for these strikers; you are being misled by your union masters into taking part in what is nothing less than a political strike. There is never an overall vote in favour of a strike, it's just the socialist militants, which was a major reason why I refused to join the union. I can assure you all that the pension will be good when you retire and you have, until recently, paid virtually nothing for it yourself. Think of those pensioners and others who are, and will be, worse off than yourselves and get back to work........ alroutemaster
  • Score: -7

2:38pm Thu 10 Jul 14

LiberalsOut says...

If you dont like the working conditions and cannot work to your contracts, why dont you leave and let other people who would like the job do it instead?
If you dont like the working conditions and cannot work to your contracts, why dont you leave and let other people who would like the job do it instead? LiberalsOut
  • Score: -7

2:41pm Thu 10 Jul 14

LiberalsOut says...

Bonnie Craven wrote:
No one takes a decision to strike lightly. A day on strike costs a day's wages and the people striking can ill afford this. As a teacher I can confirm that the NUT have been trying without success to have a discussion with Michael Gove about the real harm he is doing to our schools. Expecting more work for less pay is not acceptable. Demanding that the terms of a self-funded pension plan are changed represents a breech on contract and a mis-sold policy. Expecting teachers to stay in a job that is paying them increasingly less well, charging more for a pension for longer for a lower and shorter term of pay out are not things that can be afforded by our teachers.

We are rapidly approaching another crisis point where there will be a real shortage of teachers available as more and more experienced and good teachers are forced out of the job. This is in no one's interests. Already a large proportion of highly qualified teachers are leaving education after serving fewer years than their training took.

Expecting people to teach until they are 68 is unrealistic. Teaching is a technologically and physically demanding job where the safety and best interests of the children are not best served by people who are in their so called golden years.

Many other unions are striking today. I stand shoulder to shoulder with my brothers and sisters. Their sacrifices today are to secure a better future for us all.
Dont worry I will work until 68 to help pay for that part of your pension that the tax payer pays for
Stop whinging and get on with your job
[quote][p][bold]Bonnie Craven[/bold] wrote: No one takes a decision to strike lightly. A day on strike costs a day's wages and the people striking can ill afford this. As a teacher I can confirm that the NUT have been trying without success to have a discussion with Michael Gove about the real harm he is doing to our schools. Expecting more work for less pay is not acceptable. Demanding that the terms of a self-funded pension plan are changed represents a breech on contract and a mis-sold policy. Expecting teachers to stay in a job that is paying them increasingly less well, charging more for a pension for longer for a lower and shorter term of pay out are not things that can be afforded by our teachers. We are rapidly approaching another crisis point where there will be a real shortage of teachers available as more and more experienced and good teachers are forced out of the job. This is in no one's interests. Already a large proportion of highly qualified teachers are leaving education after serving fewer years than their training took. Expecting people to teach until they are 68 is unrealistic. Teaching is a technologically and physically demanding job where the safety and best interests of the children are not best served by people who are in their so called golden years. Many other unions are striking today. I stand shoulder to shoulder with my brothers and sisters. Their sacrifices today are to secure a better future for us all.[/p][/quote]Dont worry I will work until 68 to help pay for that part of your pension that the tax payer pays for Stop whinging and get on with your job LiberalsOut
  • Score: -3

3:57pm Thu 10 Jul 14

edstar says...

LiberalsOut wrote:
Bonnie Craven wrote:
No one takes a decision to strike lightly. A day on strike costs a day's wages and the people striking can ill afford this. As a teacher I can confirm that the NUT have been trying without success to have a discussion with Michael Gove about the real harm he is doing to our schools. Expecting more work for less pay is not acceptable. Demanding that the terms of a self-funded pension plan are changed represents a breech on contract and a mis-sold policy. Expecting teachers to stay in a job that is paying them increasingly less well, charging more for a pension for longer for a lower and shorter term of pay out are not things that can be afforded by our teachers.

We are rapidly approaching another crisis point where there will be a real shortage of teachers available as more and more experienced and good teachers are forced out of the job. This is in no one's interests. Already a large proportion of highly qualified teachers are leaving education after serving fewer years than their training took.

Expecting people to teach until they are 68 is unrealistic. Teaching is a technologically and physically demanding job where the safety and best interests of the children are not best served by people who are in their so called golden years.

Many other unions are striking today. I stand shoulder to shoulder with my brothers and sisters. Their sacrifices today are to secure a better future for us all.
Dont worry I will work until 68 to help pay for that part of your pension that the tax payer pays for
Stop whinging and get on with your job
If you don't like it, then why not become a teacher yourself?
[quote][p][bold]LiberalsOut[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bonnie Craven[/bold] wrote: No one takes a decision to strike lightly. A day on strike costs a day's wages and the people striking can ill afford this. As a teacher I can confirm that the NUT have been trying without success to have a discussion with Michael Gove about the real harm he is doing to our schools. Expecting more work for less pay is not acceptable. Demanding that the terms of a self-funded pension plan are changed represents a breech on contract and a mis-sold policy. Expecting teachers to stay in a job that is paying them increasingly less well, charging more for a pension for longer for a lower and shorter term of pay out are not things that can be afforded by our teachers. We are rapidly approaching another crisis point where there will be a real shortage of teachers available as more and more experienced and good teachers are forced out of the job. This is in no one's interests. Already a large proportion of highly qualified teachers are leaving education after serving fewer years than their training took. Expecting people to teach until they are 68 is unrealistic. Teaching is a technologically and physically demanding job where the safety and best interests of the children are not best served by people who are in their so called golden years. Many other unions are striking today. I stand shoulder to shoulder with my brothers and sisters. Their sacrifices today are to secure a better future for us all.[/p][/quote]Dont worry I will work until 68 to help pay for that part of your pension that the tax payer pays for Stop whinging and get on with your job[/p][/quote]If you don't like it, then why not become a teacher yourself? edstar
  • Score: 3

3:57pm Thu 10 Jul 14

edstar says...

LiberalsOut wrote:
Bonnie Craven wrote:
No one takes a decision to strike lightly. A day on strike costs a day's wages and the people striking can ill afford this. As a teacher I can confirm that the NUT have been trying without success to have a discussion with Michael Gove about the real harm he is doing to our schools. Expecting more work for less pay is not acceptable. Demanding that the terms of a self-funded pension plan are changed represents a breech on contract and a mis-sold policy. Expecting teachers to stay in a job that is paying them increasingly less well, charging more for a pension for longer for a lower and shorter term of pay out are not things that can be afforded by our teachers.

We are rapidly approaching another crisis point where there will be a real shortage of teachers available as more and more experienced and good teachers are forced out of the job. This is in no one's interests. Already a large proportion of highly qualified teachers are leaving education after serving fewer years than their training took.

Expecting people to teach until they are 68 is unrealistic. Teaching is a technologically and physically demanding job where the safety and best interests of the children are not best served by people who are in their so called golden years.

Many other unions are striking today. I stand shoulder to shoulder with my brothers and sisters. Their sacrifices today are to secure a better future for us all.
Dont worry I will work until 68 to help pay for that part of your pension that the tax payer pays for
Stop whinging and get on with your job
If you don't like it, then why not become a teacher yourself?
[quote][p][bold]LiberalsOut[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bonnie Craven[/bold] wrote: No one takes a decision to strike lightly. A day on strike costs a day's wages and the people striking can ill afford this. As a teacher I can confirm that the NUT have been trying without success to have a discussion with Michael Gove about the real harm he is doing to our schools. Expecting more work for less pay is not acceptable. Demanding that the terms of a self-funded pension plan are changed represents a breech on contract and a mis-sold policy. Expecting teachers to stay in a job that is paying them increasingly less well, charging more for a pension for longer for a lower and shorter term of pay out are not things that can be afforded by our teachers. We are rapidly approaching another crisis point where there will be a real shortage of teachers available as more and more experienced and good teachers are forced out of the job. This is in no one's interests. Already a large proportion of highly qualified teachers are leaving education after serving fewer years than their training took. Expecting people to teach until they are 68 is unrealistic. Teaching is a technologically and physically demanding job where the safety and best interests of the children are not best served by people who are in their so called golden years. Many other unions are striking today. I stand shoulder to shoulder with my brothers and sisters. Their sacrifices today are to secure a better future for us all.[/p][/quote]Dont worry I will work until 68 to help pay for that part of your pension that the tax payer pays for Stop whinging and get on with your job[/p][/quote]If you don't like it, then why not become a teacher yourself? edstar
  • Score: 1

4:30pm Sat 12 Jul 14

trojan says...

Can't believe the way in which some people love to take advantage of the benefits unions have put in place over the years(sick pay, holiday pay, maternity leave, etc etc........) yet don't support the people being abused by the current government whilst they try to educate the countries future workers, leaders and (dare I say it ) voters!
The people complaining about the strike wouldn't last 5 minutes working under Gove and should research their argument before commenting!
Fuming.........again
!
Can't believe the way in which some people love to take advantage of the benefits unions have put in place over the years(sick pay, holiday pay, maternity leave, etc etc........) yet don't support the people being abused by the current government whilst they try to educate the countries future workers, leaders and (dare I say it ) voters! The people complaining about the strike wouldn't last 5 minutes working under Gove and should research their argument before commenting! Fuming.........again ! trojan
  • Score: 6

3:59pm Sun 13 Jul 14

Bonnie Craven says...

No workers rights were granted by benevolent bosses. Every thing we as workers enjoy was hard fought for by the Unions. Weekends, bank holidays, maternity rights, paternity rights, sick pay, paid holidays and so forth.

With an ever disappearing retirement age, we are looking at a situation where the fittest, healthiest and most energetic teachers will be denied the ability to teach if roles are filled with elderly people who are no longer at the top of their game, but are biding their time until retirement.

The teachers pension, and those of other public sectors, were a part of the terms and conditions under which we became employed as teachers. Teachers salaries are poor, with even top level staff earning less in one year than a bonus of some in the private sector. Many teachers cannot afford to stay in the role and we are rapidly approaching another teacher shortage crisis with people often lasting fewer years in the classroom than it took them to qualify.

We are in a world where we are warned of increasing cases of premature dementia and mental health issues, so whilst people are living longer we have to look at morbidity rather than mortality.
No workers rights were granted by benevolent bosses. Every thing we as workers enjoy was hard fought for by the Unions. Weekends, bank holidays, maternity rights, paternity rights, sick pay, paid holidays and so forth. With an ever disappearing retirement age, we are looking at a situation where the fittest, healthiest and most energetic teachers will be denied the ability to teach if roles are filled with elderly people who are no longer at the top of their game, but are biding their time until retirement. The teachers pension, and those of other public sectors, were a part of the terms and conditions under which we became employed as teachers. Teachers salaries are poor, with even top level staff earning less in one year than a bonus of some in the private sector. Many teachers cannot afford to stay in the role and we are rapidly approaching another teacher shortage crisis with people often lasting fewer years in the classroom than it took them to qualify. We are in a world where we are warned of increasing cases of premature dementia and mental health issues, so whilst people are living longer we have to look at morbidity rather than mortality. Bonnie Craven
  • Score: 2

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