A total of 55 applications were submitted to the council in the week ending June 22

Planning applications submitted for Waltham Forest

Planning applications submitted for Waltham Forest

First published in News
Last updated
This Is Local London: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter, covering Chingford, Highams Park and Woodford. Call me on 07795 476 625

Here is a list of the most recent applications submitted to the council for the week ending June 22.

Ms Ridley Ellie: Single storey extension at 9 Courtenay Road, Leytonstone, E11.

Everything Everywhere Ltd: Installation of 11.5m high telecommunications mast at 319 High Road, Leytonstone, E11 4JT.

Mr Umer Tariq: Single storey extension at 47 Cecil Road, Walthamstow, E17 5DH.

Mr J Register: Singloe storey extension at 67 Aveling Park Road, Walthamstow, E17 4NS.

Mr A Yousaf: Variation of planning permission condition to allow opening hours of the premises at 637 Forest Road, Walthamstow, E17 4NE.

Mrs Angela Lyons: Single storey extension at 67 Garner Road, Walthamstow, E17.

Mr Christopher Okeepe: Single storey extension at 42 Queens Grove Road, Chingford, E4.

Mr & Mrs Frances and Ian Black: Construction of two storey, three bedroom dwelling house at 35 Kimberley Road, Chingford, E4.

Mrs S Gireson: Ground and first floor rear extension, roof extension and two storey building at rear of 46-50 Sewardstone Road, Chingford, E4.

For full details of latest planning applications, see next week's Guardian. 

Comments (8)

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9:45am Sat 28 Jun 14

Villagecranberry says...

Facinating.
Facinating. Villagecranberry
  • Score: 0

12:24pm Sat 28 Jun 14

StanE11 says...

The latest Land Registry figures have LBWF house price inflation running at 26% (twenty six). That suggests that firstly accurate valuations are tricky, and that lots of people will cash in. This being London the area will remain racially mixed, but nowhere near the same degree as before. With the construction of the Manhattan building due to begin this year we could soon see the most expensive property ever marketed in LBN. It's a radical demographic shift, and the IQ by Stratford International hasn't even started yet. Look at the changes in the last five years, I can foresee these rapidly accelerating. The QE2 park hasn't embedded itself in popular culture yet, Crossrail is only 4 years away, there are big changes to come and more improvements and refurbishment of existing housing stock. Leytonstone is finally booming, and if you think about it it's a reversion to the emerging aspirant middle class the Victorians built these houses for.

Exciting times.
The latest Land Registry figures have LBWF house price inflation running at 26% (twenty six). That suggests that firstly accurate valuations are tricky, and that lots of people will cash in. This being London the area will remain racially mixed, but nowhere near the same degree as before. With the construction of the Manhattan building due to begin this year we could soon see the most expensive property ever marketed in LBN. It's a radical demographic shift, and the IQ by Stratford International hasn't even started yet. Look at the changes in the last five years, I can foresee these rapidly accelerating. The QE2 park hasn't embedded itself in popular culture yet, Crossrail is only 4 years away, there are big changes to come and more improvements and refurbishment of existing housing stock. Leytonstone is finally booming, and if you think about it it's a reversion to the emerging aspirant middle class the Victorians built these houses for. Exciting times. StanE11
  • Score: 3

12:49pm Sat 28 Jun 14

Villagecranberry says...

StanE11 wrote:
The latest Land Registry figures have LBWF house price inflation running at 26% (twenty six). That suggests that firstly accurate valuations are tricky, and that lots of people will cash in. This being London the area will remain racially mixed, but nowhere near the same degree as before. With the construction of the Manhattan building due to begin this year we could soon see the most expensive property ever marketed in LBN. It's a radical demographic shift, and the IQ by Stratford International hasn't even started yet. Look at the changes in the last five years, I can foresee these rapidly accelerating. The QE2 park hasn't embedded itself in popular culture yet, Crossrail is only 4 years away, there are big changes to come and more improvements and refurbishment of existing housing stock. Leytonstone is finally booming, and if you think about it it's a reversion to the emerging aspirant middle class the Victorians built these houses for.

Exciting times.
Leytonstone shopping is still a depressing experience, with beggars and vagabonds accosting shoppers on a daily basis. Walthamstow High Street has lost its charm of yesteryear but recently there seems to be a sparkle of hope that this may return.
[quote][p][bold]StanE11[/bold] wrote: The latest Land Registry figures have LBWF house price inflation running at 26% (twenty six). That suggests that firstly accurate valuations are tricky, and that lots of people will cash in. This being London the area will remain racially mixed, but nowhere near the same degree as before. With the construction of the Manhattan building due to begin this year we could soon see the most expensive property ever marketed in LBN. It's a radical demographic shift, and the IQ by Stratford International hasn't even started yet. Look at the changes in the last five years, I can foresee these rapidly accelerating. The QE2 park hasn't embedded itself in popular culture yet, Crossrail is only 4 years away, there are big changes to come and more improvements and refurbishment of existing housing stock. Leytonstone is finally booming, and if you think about it it's a reversion to the emerging aspirant middle class the Victorians built these houses for. Exciting times.[/p][/quote]Leytonstone shopping is still a depressing experience, with beggars and vagabonds accosting shoppers on a daily basis. Walthamstow High Street has lost its charm of yesteryear but recently there seems to be a sparkle of hope that this may return. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -1

1:17pm Sat 28 Jun 14

mdj says...

'Exciting times.'

Indeed; after decades of stagnation, much of it due to the political regime which happily fed on it, parts of the borough increasingly have a cared-for look.
The worry is that we are seeing not regeneration, which lifts the area and its residents, but gentrification, which prices them out.
We are in the shock wave of a sort of neutron bomb of international cash, much of it ill-gotten, using Zone 1 property as a form of bullion that pays rent. The property remains, but the occupants are eradicated.
Wealth that makes an area unaffordable for its young to remain as adults where they grew up is not really wealth at all for most people.


Again, thanks to the WFG for the important if mundane task of keeping us informed. It's a disgrace that the Council does not use its own 'free' paper to carry this information.
'Exciting times.' Indeed; after decades of stagnation, much of it due to the political regime which happily fed on it, parts of the borough increasingly have a cared-for look. The worry is that we are seeing not regeneration, which lifts the area and its residents, but gentrification, which prices them out. We are in the shock wave of a sort of neutron bomb of international cash, much of it ill-gotten, using Zone 1 property as a form of bullion that pays rent. The property remains, but the occupants are eradicated. Wealth that makes an area unaffordable for its young to remain as adults where they grew up is not really wealth at all for most people. Again, thanks to the WFG for the important if mundane task of keeping us informed. It's a disgrace that the Council does not use its own 'free' paper to carry this information. mdj
  • Score: 2

1:55pm Sat 28 Jun 14

Stevo98 says...

mdj wrote:
'Exciting times.'

Indeed; after decades of stagnation, much of it due to the political regime which happily fed on it, parts of the borough increasingly have a cared-for look.
The worry is that we are seeing not regeneration, which lifts the area and its residents, but gentrification, which prices them out.
We are in the shock wave of a sort of neutron bomb of international cash, much of it ill-gotten, using Zone 1 property as a form of bullion that pays rent. The property remains, but the occupants are eradicated.
Wealth that makes an area unaffordable for its young to remain as adults where they grew up is not really wealth at all for most people.


Again, thanks to the WFG for the important if mundane task of keeping us informed. It's a disgrace that the Council does not use its own 'free' paper to carry this information.
Can't argue with any of that, the gentrification is despite not because of anything WF have done, indeed one could argue the decline of Leytonstone High Road began in the fifties with the road layout changes and installation of railings. But now you have that funky boutique bakers, the Goose or something, a new bike shop for the hipster fixes to replace the old Daycocks, art shows and people moving in who are priced out of E8 and N1. You can't really describe Leytonstone as a forgotten corner of East London any more. A few more police raids like the ones this week targeting stupid little gangs running round with knives would be good. The bottom end of the high road is still a toilet.
[quote][p][bold]mdj[/bold] wrote: 'Exciting times.' Indeed; after decades of stagnation, much of it due to the political regime which happily fed on it, parts of the borough increasingly have a cared-for look. The worry is that we are seeing not regeneration, which lifts the area and its residents, but gentrification, which prices them out. We are in the shock wave of a sort of neutron bomb of international cash, much of it ill-gotten, using Zone 1 property as a form of bullion that pays rent. The property remains, but the occupants are eradicated. Wealth that makes an area unaffordable for its young to remain as adults where they grew up is not really wealth at all for most people. Again, thanks to the WFG for the important if mundane task of keeping us informed. It's a disgrace that the Council does not use its own 'free' paper to carry this information.[/p][/quote]Can't argue with any of that, the gentrification is despite not because of anything WF have done, indeed one could argue the decline of Leytonstone High Road began in the fifties with the road layout changes and installation of railings. But now you have that funky boutique bakers, the Goose or something, a new bike shop for the hipster fixes to replace the old Daycocks, art shows and people moving in who are priced out of E8 and N1. You can't really describe Leytonstone as a forgotten corner of East London any more. A few more police raids like the ones this week targeting stupid little gangs running round with knives would be good. The bottom end of the high road is still a toilet. Stevo98
  • Score: 7

7:16pm Sat 28 Jun 14

Villagecranberry says...

Neil 62% business rate rise Gerrard killed South Leytonstone years ago.
Neil 62% business rate rise Gerrard killed South Leytonstone years ago. Villagecranberry
  • Score: -4

10:09am Mon 30 Jun 14

Sam Hain says...

mdj wrote:
'Exciting times.'

Indeed; after decades of stagnation, much of it due to the political regime which happily fed on it, parts of the borough increasingly have a cared-for look.
The worry is that we are seeing not regeneration, which lifts the area and its residents, but gentrification, which prices them out.
We are in the shock wave of a sort of neutron bomb of international cash, much of it ill-gotten, using Zone 1 property as a form of bullion that pays rent. The property remains, but the occupants are eradicated.
Wealth that makes an area unaffordable for its young to remain as adults where they grew up is not really wealth at all for most people.


Again, thanks to the WFG for the important if mundane task of keeping us informed. It's a disgrace that the Council does not use its own 'free' paper to carry this information.
But Pickles insists WF News should go quarterly, mdj, so not much scope for regular planning application updates there it would seem. There's always the council website, of course, but I know you, like me, appreciate printed matter. How to square this circle?
[quote][p][bold]mdj[/bold] wrote: 'Exciting times.' Indeed; after decades of stagnation, much of it due to the political regime which happily fed on it, parts of the borough increasingly have a cared-for look. The worry is that we are seeing not regeneration, which lifts the area and its residents, but gentrification, which prices them out. We are in the shock wave of a sort of neutron bomb of international cash, much of it ill-gotten, using Zone 1 property as a form of bullion that pays rent. The property remains, but the occupants are eradicated. Wealth that makes an area unaffordable for its young to remain as adults where they grew up is not really wealth at all for most people. Again, thanks to the WFG for the important if mundane task of keeping us informed. It's a disgrace that the Council does not use its own 'free' paper to carry this information.[/p][/quote]But Pickles insists WF News should go quarterly, mdj, so not much scope for regular planning application updates there it would seem. There's always the council website, of course, but I know you, like me, appreciate printed matter. How to square this circle? Sam Hain
  • Score: 0

12:21pm Mon 30 Jun 14

mdj says...

' How to square this circle?'
Well, in the past the Council simply paid for advertising space in 'a paper circulating locally', as the law required.
But respect for the law - or even its own procedures - has never figured strongly with this council, as the ongoing scandals of the BID and NL Business reveal.

If the paper is willing to publish the same information in the form of a simple regular press release, that's a good, if unselfish, solution.
' How to square this circle?' Well, in the past the Council simply paid for advertising space in 'a paper circulating locally', as the law required. But respect for the law - or even its own procedures - has never figured strongly with this council, as the ongoing scandals of the BID and NL Business reveal. If the paper is willing to publish the same information in the form of a simple regular press release, that's a good, if unselfish, solution. mdj
  • Score: 0

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