Expectant teenage dad found hanging after school jibes, court hears

This Is Local London: Liam Hardy enjoyed going to the Sea Cadets Liam Hardy enjoyed going to the Sea Cadets

A 14-year-old expectant father was teased at school before he was found hanged in a bedroom at his grandparents' house, an inquest heard.

Liam Hardy, of Lancaster Way in Worcester Park, was looking forward to the birth of his child but had been struggling with difficulties in his personal life and at school prior to his death in November 2012, Croydon Coroner's Court heard today.

The court also heard how his mother felt support services did not listen to her concerns about Liam and felt no one took her seriously.

Liam, a popular pupil at Carshalton Boys Sports College who enjoyed going to Sea Cadets, was found hanged in a bedroom at his parents’ house in Stonecot Hill on November 19, 2012.
He died in hospital eight days later.

This Is Local London:

Liam Hardy with his mum Janine

At today’s start of a week long inquest, the court heard how Liam had made threats on his life since he was eight-years-old and was prone to self-harm.

The court also heard that Liam was due to become a father and had been planning for the arrival of his child.

But his mother Janine Hardy told the court he had been bullied at school over his impending fatherhood.

She said: "He was worried about it like any young person would be. He was very excited and he always referred to the baby by the name they had chosen for it.

"It was really quite grown up of him. I was very proud of him.

"There had been a bit of trouble [at school].

"He was very hurt by the comments. A boy was verbally abusing Liam then Liam said some stuff back to him and the boy hit him in the face five times."

The court heard Liam suffered from epilepsy as a child but had grown out of the symptoms in recent years. The court heard that he had problems at school from a young age and his anger would manifest itself in violent outbursts towards Ms Hardy at home.

Liam and Ms Hardy sought help through various sources including Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) which assigned a specialist to work with Liam.

But Ms Hardy told the court Liam did not get on with the specialist and refused to cooperate.

She said various social services worked with Liam but always believed him when he told them he was fine even though she told them about her concerns.

Ms Hardy added: "No-one took us seriously."

The inquest is expected to continue until the end of this week.

Comments (13)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

6:16pm Mon 9 Jun 14

unebalam says...

This is terribly sad, my heart goes out to Liam's family, partner and esp his child to be.
Life rarely goes according to our expectations or wishes, the key is to make the best of it and also help others to make the best of thier lives.
To those people who delight in attacking and abusing (and this includes people who judge others please keep your negative opinions to yourself) others I say I pity you. There is a very good chance you are like that because someone has attacked and abused you, taken you opportunties and dreams away but only you can break that cycle.
My advice to others who are attacked and abused would be to simply ignore the abuser, do not respond to them, like parasites they feed from your reactions move away from them but most importantly do not suffer this in silence, speak candidly with someone you trust and help and support will be yours.
Bully's are the lonely ones, Bully's are the sad ones, Bully's are not brave enough to ask for help
This is terribly sad, my heart goes out to Liam's family, partner and esp his child to be. Life rarely goes according to our expectations or wishes, the key is to make the best of it and also help others to make the best of thier lives. To those people who delight in attacking and abusing (and this includes people who judge others please keep your negative opinions to yourself) others I say I pity you. There is a very good chance you are like that because someone has attacked and abused you, taken you opportunties and dreams away but only you can break that cycle. My advice to others who are attacked and abused would be to simply ignore the abuser, do not respond to them, like parasites they feed from your reactions move away from them but most importantly do not suffer this in silence, speak candidly with someone you trust and help and support will be yours. Bully's are the lonely ones, Bully's are the sad ones, Bully's are not brave enough to ask for help unebalam
  • Score: 32

6:40pm Mon 9 Jun 14

Noddyblanket says...

unebalam wrote:
This is terribly sad, my heart goes out to Liam's family, partner and esp his child to be.
Life rarely goes according to our expectations or wishes, the key is to make the best of it and also help others to make the best of thier lives.
To those people who delight in attacking and abusing (and this includes people who judge others please keep your negative opinions to yourself) others I say I pity you. There is a very good chance you are like that because someone has attacked and abused you, taken you opportunties and dreams away but only you can break that cycle.
My advice to others who are attacked and abused would be to simply ignore the abuser, do not respond to them, like parasites they feed from your reactions move away from them but most importantly do not suffer this in silence, speak candidly with someone you trust and help and support will be yours.
Bully's are the lonely ones, Bully's are the sad ones, Bully's are not brave enough to ask for help
Totally agree. And to everyone who bullies, remember how bitter you make that person and how they turn to bully others when they feel so bad about themselves. Also parents, shower your kids with love and enable them to have the confidence and self worth to show compassion and kindness to others, rather than get their kicks by making others lives a misery... We can all make a change to make the world a kinder place. RIP young man x
[quote][p][bold]unebalam[/bold] wrote: This is terribly sad, my heart goes out to Liam's family, partner and esp his child to be. Life rarely goes according to our expectations or wishes, the key is to make the best of it and also help others to make the best of thier lives. To those people who delight in attacking and abusing (and this includes people who judge others please keep your negative opinions to yourself) others I say I pity you. There is a very good chance you are like that because someone has attacked and abused you, taken you opportunties and dreams away but only you can break that cycle. My advice to others who are attacked and abused would be to simply ignore the abuser, do not respond to them, like parasites they feed from your reactions move away from them but most importantly do not suffer this in silence, speak candidly with someone you trust and help and support will be yours. Bully's are the lonely ones, Bully's are the sad ones, Bully's are not brave enough to ask for help[/p][/quote]Totally agree. And to everyone who bullies, remember how bitter you make that person and how they turn to bully others when they feel so bad about themselves. Also parents, shower your kids with love and enable them to have the confidence and self worth to show compassion and kindness to others, rather than get their kicks by making others lives a misery... We can all make a change to make the world a kinder place. RIP young man x Noddyblanket
  • Score: 25

9:04pm Mon 9 Jun 14

Suttonwrkr says...

Very sad and I feel for his family, it's such a shame that so many people feel that this is the only way to stop any pain. I do think it's a very blunt way to say how it happened it can touch an emotional nerve with people who may have gone through the same thing. May be the editors could think twice before using such a title to the news that I hope his family don't mind being published.
Very sad and I feel for his family, it's such a shame that so many people feel that this is the only way to stop any pain. I do think it's a very blunt way to say how it happened it can touch an emotional nerve with people who may have gone through the same thing. May be the editors could think twice before using such a title to the news that I hope his family don't mind being published. Suttonwrkr
  • Score: 17

9:14am Tue 10 Jun 14

jswan1 says...

Horrific story, sorry to hear it. It sounds like the boy had a troubled upbringing to be self harming, threatening to take his own life from an early age and having under age sex. Hopefully the child will have a happier life.

I feel sorry for the bullies too. I think a lot of bullies are troubled themselves and don't realise the extent of the damage they are doing. I think often when they are older, bullies are haunted by their childhood actions and many feel regret.
Horrific story, sorry to hear it. It sounds like the boy had a troubled upbringing to be self harming, threatening to take his own life from an early age and having under age sex. Hopefully the child will have a happier life. I feel sorry for the bullies too. I think a lot of bullies are troubled themselves and don't realise the extent of the damage they are doing. I think often when they are older, bullies are haunted by their childhood actions and many feel regret. jswan1
  • Score: 12

1:16pm Tue 10 Jun 14

kingstonpaul says...

jswan1 wrote:
Horrific story, sorry to hear it. It sounds like the boy had a troubled upbringing to be self harming, threatening to take his own life from an early age and having under age sex. Hopefully the child will have a happier life.

I feel sorry for the bullies too. I think a lot of bullies are troubled themselves and don't realise the extent of the damage they are doing. I think often when they are older, bullies are haunted by their childhood actions and many feel regret.
Appeasing nonsense. You feel sorry for the bullies? In my experience, most bullies know exactly what they're doing and what the consequences are. The only language bullies respond to is a sound kicking - we don't have the resources to pander to the bully.
[quote][p][bold]jswan1[/bold] wrote: Horrific story, sorry to hear it. It sounds like the boy had a troubled upbringing to be self harming, threatening to take his own life from an early age and having under age sex. Hopefully the child will have a happier life. I feel sorry for the bullies too. I think a lot of bullies are troubled themselves and don't realise the extent of the damage they are doing. I think often when they are older, bullies are haunted by their childhood actions and many feel regret.[/p][/quote]Appeasing nonsense. You feel sorry for the bullies? In my experience, most bullies know exactly what they're doing and what the consequences are. The only language bullies respond to is a sound kicking - we don't have the resources to pander to the bully. kingstonpaul
  • Score: 5

9:21pm Tue 10 Jun 14

S.O.B.S says...

This is just another case of the mental health services letting another young man down.
The scenario is so similar to what my son was subjected to - when is this society going to help our most needy.
The stigma and sensationalising press reporting never ends.
My heart goes out to his family and friends.
Strangely my son was a Sea Cadet too - lot of unanswered questions there!!!
This is just another case of the mental health services letting another young man down. The scenario is so similar to what my son was subjected to - when is this society going to help our most needy. The stigma and sensationalising press reporting never ends. My heart goes out to his family and friends. Strangely my son was a Sea Cadet too - lot of unanswered questions there!!! S.O.B.S
  • Score: 1

5:51pm Wed 11 Jun 14

alroutemaster says...

Yes it is tragic, but as always in today's society the family blame everyone else. And to be proud of someone who gets a girl pregnant at 14? Strange.
Yes it is tragic, but as always in today's society the family blame everyone else. And to be proud of someone who gets a girl pregnant at 14? Strange. alroutemaster
  • Score: 12

10:53pm Wed 11 Jun 14

rhiannonpaige says...

alroutemaster wrote:
Yes it is tragic, but as always in today's society the family blame everyone else. And to be proud of someone who gets a girl pregnant at 14? Strange.
HOW DARE YOU!!! YOU CLEARLY DIDN'T KNOW LIAM OR WHAT HE WAS LIKE SO WHY IN THE WORLD WOULD YOUR OPINION BE WANTED ON WHETHER WE SHOULD BE PROUD OF HIM OR NOT? PEOPLE LIKE YOU DISGUST ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[quote][p][bold]alroutemaster[/bold] wrote: Yes it is tragic, but as always in today's society the family blame everyone else. And to be proud of someone who gets a girl pregnant at 14? Strange.[/p][/quote]HOW DARE YOU!!! YOU CLEARLY DIDN'T KNOW LIAM OR WHAT HE WAS LIKE SO WHY IN THE WORLD WOULD YOUR OPINION BE WANTED ON WHETHER WE SHOULD BE PROUD OF HIM OR NOT? PEOPLE LIKE YOU DISGUST ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! rhiannonpaige
  • Score: -9

9:23am Thu 12 Jun 14

jswan1 says...

kingstonpaul wrote:
jswan1 wrote:
Horrific story, sorry to hear it. It sounds like the boy had a troubled upbringing to be self harming, threatening to take his own life from an early age and having under age sex. Hopefully the child will have a happier life.

I feel sorry for the bullies too. I think a lot of bullies are troubled themselves and don't realise the extent of the damage they are doing. I think often when they are older, bullies are haunted by their childhood actions and many feel regret.
Appeasing nonsense. You feel sorry for the bullies? In my experience, most bullies know exactly what they're doing and what the consequences are. The only language bullies respond to is a sound kicking - we don't have the resources to pander to the bully.
Oh my goodness! Oh my goodness how can you say such a thing?

Yes, I do feel sorry for the bullies because these people are all kids. There is a reason why we don't treat children the same as adults when they commit crimes.

The bullies are also kids. Kids often do things without knowing the full extent of the damage their actions can cause.

To suggest that the best treatment for the child who bullied this boy is to give him "a sound kicking" is ludicrous.

There will have been some event or sequence of events in the kids life which led to him behaving in a bullying manner. He probably doesn't understand how or why he is like this and will now have to carry the guilt of this suicide with him for the rest of his life.

The best treatment for bullying is for better education in schools. There should be more focus on educating children on the psychology of it all. Educate them on how people become bullies, some of the reasons that cause it, and how their behaviour can affect others and themselves in the short and long term.

Education is a much better lesson for these kids than "a sound kicking".
[quote][p][bold]kingstonpaul[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jswan1[/bold] wrote: Horrific story, sorry to hear it. It sounds like the boy had a troubled upbringing to be self harming, threatening to take his own life from an early age and having under age sex. Hopefully the child will have a happier life. I feel sorry for the bullies too. I think a lot of bullies are troubled themselves and don't realise the extent of the damage they are doing. I think often when they are older, bullies are haunted by their childhood actions and many feel regret.[/p][/quote]Appeasing nonsense. You feel sorry for the bullies? In my experience, most bullies know exactly what they're doing and what the consequences are. The only language bullies respond to is a sound kicking - we don't have the resources to pander to the bully.[/p][/quote]Oh my goodness! Oh my goodness how can you say such a thing? Yes, I do feel sorry for the bullies because these people are all kids. There is a reason why we don't treat children the same as adults when they commit crimes. The bullies are also kids. Kids often do things without knowing the full extent of the damage their actions can cause. To suggest that the best treatment for the child who bullied this boy is to give him "a sound kicking" is ludicrous. There will have been some event or sequence of events in the kids life which led to him behaving in a bullying manner. He probably doesn't understand how or why he is like this and will now have to carry the guilt of this suicide with him for the rest of his life. The best treatment for bullying is for better education in schools. There should be more focus on educating children on the psychology of it all. Educate them on how people become bullies, some of the reasons that cause it, and how their behaviour can affect others and themselves in the short and long term. Education is a much better lesson for these kids than "a sound kicking". jswan1
  • Score: 1

12:34pm Thu 12 Jun 14

kingstonpaul says...

jswan1 wrote:
kingstonpaul wrote:
jswan1 wrote:
Horrific story, sorry to hear it. It sounds like the boy had a troubled upbringing to be self harming, threatening to take his own life from an early age and having under age sex. Hopefully the child will have a happier life.

I feel sorry for the bullies too. I think a lot of bullies are troubled themselves and don't realise the extent of the damage they are doing. I think often when they are older, bullies are haunted by their childhood actions and many feel regret.
Appeasing nonsense. You feel sorry for the bullies? In my experience, most bullies know exactly what they're doing and what the consequences are. The only language bullies respond to is a sound kicking - we don't have the resources to pander to the bully.
Oh my goodness! Oh my goodness how can you say such a thing?

Yes, I do feel sorry for the bullies because these people are all kids. There is a reason why we don't treat children the same as adults when they commit crimes.

The bullies are also kids. Kids often do things without knowing the full extent of the damage their actions can cause.

To suggest that the best treatment for the child who bullied this boy is to give him "a sound kicking" is ludicrous.

There will have been some event or sequence of events in the kids life which led to him behaving in a bullying manner. He probably doesn't understand how or why he is like this and will now have to carry the guilt of this suicide with him for the rest of his life.

The best treatment for bullying is for better education in schools. There should be more focus on educating children on the psychology of it all. Educate them on how people become bullies, some of the reasons that cause it, and how their behaviour can affect others and themselves in the short and long term.

Education is a much better lesson for these kids than "a sound kicking".
Your post just reinforces my point about appeasing nonsense. Look, there's plenty of evidence that supports the notion that with the majority of bullies, there is no family circumstance or psycholigical condition that pre-disposes the behaviour.
We are all animals, and in our bit of the animal kingdom, there will always be aggressor types that look to control others through force and intimidation.
When I was at school, it was quite noticeable how bullies changed their behaviour when someone gave them a good hiding behind the bike shed. It worked back then, it works now.
[quote][p][bold]jswan1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kingstonpaul[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jswan1[/bold] wrote: Horrific story, sorry to hear it. It sounds like the boy had a troubled upbringing to be self harming, threatening to take his own life from an early age and having under age sex. Hopefully the child will have a happier life. I feel sorry for the bullies too. I think a lot of bullies are troubled themselves and don't realise the extent of the damage they are doing. I think often when they are older, bullies are haunted by their childhood actions and many feel regret.[/p][/quote]Appeasing nonsense. You feel sorry for the bullies? In my experience, most bullies know exactly what they're doing and what the consequences are. The only language bullies respond to is a sound kicking - we don't have the resources to pander to the bully.[/p][/quote]Oh my goodness! Oh my goodness how can you say such a thing? Yes, I do feel sorry for the bullies because these people are all kids. There is a reason why we don't treat children the same as adults when they commit crimes. The bullies are also kids. Kids often do things without knowing the full extent of the damage their actions can cause. To suggest that the best treatment for the child who bullied this boy is to give him "a sound kicking" is ludicrous. There will have been some event or sequence of events in the kids life which led to him behaving in a bullying manner. He probably doesn't understand how or why he is like this and will now have to carry the guilt of this suicide with him for the rest of his life. The best treatment for bullying is for better education in schools. There should be more focus on educating children on the psychology of it all. Educate them on how people become bullies, some of the reasons that cause it, and how their behaviour can affect others and themselves in the short and long term. Education is a much better lesson for these kids than "a sound kicking".[/p][/quote]Your post just reinforces my point about appeasing nonsense. Look, there's plenty of evidence that supports the notion that with the majority of bullies, there is no family circumstance or psycholigical condition that pre-disposes the behaviour. We are all animals, and in our bit of the animal kingdom, there will always be aggressor types that look to control others through force and intimidation. When I was at school, it was quite noticeable how bullies changed their behaviour when someone gave them a good hiding behind the bike shed. It worked back then, it works now. kingstonpaul
  • Score: -3

2:28pm Thu 12 Jun 14

jswan1 says...

Show me the evidence you talk of. Show it to me!

Violence against bullies is completely wrong. Violence against anybody is wrong.

If you beat up a bully he will just find somebody else to take his frustrations on.

If the education is right, when these kids realise in the classroom that they have been a bully it will be embarrassing for them. Nobody will want to be know as a bully or be seen to have bullying characteristics if they can learn about the causes and impacts of it in the classroom.
Show me the evidence you talk of. Show it to me! Violence against bullies is completely wrong. Violence against anybody is wrong. If you beat up a bully he will just find somebody else to take his frustrations on. If the education is right, when these kids realise in the classroom that they have been a bully it will be embarrassing for them. Nobody will want to be know as a bully or be seen to have bullying characteristics if they can learn about the causes and impacts of it in the classroom. jswan1
  • Score: 4

5:26pm Fri 13 Jun 14

Noddyblanket says...

rhiannonpaige wrote:
alroutemaster wrote:
Yes it is tragic, but as always in today's society the family blame everyone else. And to be proud of someone who gets a girl pregnant at 14? Strange.
HOW DARE YOU!!! YOU CLEARLY DIDN'T KNOW LIAM OR WHAT HE WAS LIKE SO WHY IN THE WORLD WOULD YOUR OPINION BE WANTED ON WHETHER WE SHOULD BE PROUD OF HIM OR NOT? PEOPLE LIKE YOU DISGUST ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Can't believe how nasty some people are! Someone has lost their son and you say something like that! Someone having a child underage is not the worst thing in the world somebody can do. Yes, we all know it's not ideal but it would hardly call for his family to lose pride in him. He didn't kill anyone or anything. How hurtful to say that. Hope you are living your life perfectly to judge others like that.
[quote][p][bold]rhiannonpaige[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alroutemaster[/bold] wrote: Yes it is tragic, but as always in today's society the family blame everyone else. And to be proud of someone who gets a girl pregnant at 14? Strange.[/p][/quote]HOW DARE YOU!!! YOU CLEARLY DIDN'T KNOW LIAM OR WHAT HE WAS LIKE SO WHY IN THE WORLD WOULD YOUR OPINION BE WANTED ON WHETHER WE SHOULD BE PROUD OF HIM OR NOT? PEOPLE LIKE YOU DISGUST ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!![/p][/quote]Can't believe how nasty some people are! Someone has lost their son and you say something like that! Someone having a child underage is not the worst thing in the world somebody can do. Yes, we all know it's not ideal but it would hardly call for his family to lose pride in him. He didn't kill anyone or anything. How hurtful to say that. Hope you are living your life perfectly to judge others like that. Noddyblanket
  • Score: 8

1:23pm Mon 7 Jul 14

fn1234 says...

jswan1 wrote:
Show me the evidence you talk of. Show it to me!

Violence against bullies is completely wrong. Violence against anybody is wrong.

If you beat up a bully he will just find somebody else to take his frustrations on.

If the education is right, when these kids realise in the classroom that they have been a bully it will be embarrassing for them. Nobody will want to be know as a bully or be seen to have bullying characteristics if they can learn about the causes and impacts of it in the classroom.
It's ironic that you call for greater education, when you have so little understanding about the psychology of bullying. In your mind bullies have no idea what they're doing, so what exactly do they do it for? Bullying gives people a sense of control and power, you cannot force someone to be sympathetic or empathetic. I have worked with plenty of Nurses from fairly decent upbringings who have been educated plenty through courses and laboral experience about empathy, sympathy and how abuse affects people, but that hasn't stopped them from being quick-tempered and abusive to patients and even staff. If so many adult Nurses disregard their education, explain how a young bully wit immature thought patterns, from a poor socio-economic background, whose parents often encourage aggressive behaviour will utterly change his/her conduct fro 30 minutes in a classroom for several weeks, more so when the bully enjoys the power trip offered from bullying. It is rightly said that empathy/sympathy for someone often develops once you have walked in their shoes or shared very similar experiences. If an abuser is treated with a dose of the same medicine, he/she thinks twice about doing it again. That is basic human psychology.
[quote][p][bold]jswan1[/bold] wrote: Show me the evidence you talk of. Show it to me! Violence against bullies is completely wrong. Violence against anybody is wrong. If you beat up a bully he will just find somebody else to take his frustrations on. If the education is right, when these kids realise in the classroom that they have been a bully it will be embarrassing for them. Nobody will want to be know as a bully or be seen to have bullying characteristics if they can learn about the causes and impacts of it in the classroom.[/p][/quote]It's ironic that you call for greater education, when you have so little understanding about the psychology of bullying. In your mind bullies have no idea what they're doing, so what exactly do they do it for? Bullying gives people a sense of control and power, you cannot force someone to be sympathetic or empathetic. I have worked with plenty of Nurses from fairly decent upbringings who have been educated plenty through courses and laboral experience about empathy, sympathy and how abuse affects people, but that hasn't stopped them from being quick-tempered and abusive to patients and even staff. If so many adult Nurses disregard their education, explain how a young bully wit immature thought patterns, from a poor socio-economic background, whose parents often encourage aggressive behaviour will utterly change his/her conduct fro 30 minutes in a classroom for several weeks, more so when the bully enjoys the power trip offered from bullying. It is rightly said that empathy/sympathy for someone often develops once you have walked in their shoes or shared very similar experiences. If an abuser is treated with a dose of the same medicine, he/she thinks twice about doing it again. That is basic human psychology. fn1234
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree