Top 10 things you don't know about Sutton

This Is Local London: Former Deputy Borough Commander Chas Bailey Former Deputy Borough Commander Chas Bailey

Few people know more about Sutton than former policeman Chas Bailey.

He used to be the Deputy Borough Commander, but now he does historic walks around the town centre.

Here are his top ten things you might not know know about Sutton

1. Sutton gets a mention in the history records as far back as 675 AD when Frithwald, the Governor of Surrey, gave the land to the Abbot of Chertsey.

This Is Local London: Sutton town centre January 2014

2. Roundshaw estate is built on the runways of the old Croydon Aerodrome, which was a fighter base during the battle of Britain - hence many of the roads on the estate are named after plans including Spitfire Road.

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3. Worcester Park takes its name from the 4th Earl of Worcester who looked after Henry VIII's great hunting park that stretched from what we now call Cheam, Nonsuch and Cuddington all the way to Worcester Park.

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4. The Oaks horse race, which now takes place as part of the Epsom Derby Festival, began in 1625 as a hell-for-leather cross country race. The four mile course originally started in the Carshalton Oaks area and finished on Epsom Downs.

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5. A pair of rare peregrine falcons have been nesting on top of Quadrant House - home to the Sutton Guardian - for several years.

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6. The sound of marching Roman Legionnaires would have reverberated along Stonecot Hill and London Road - they form part of Roman a highway known as Stane Street that stretched 56 miles from Chichester to London Bridge.

This Is Local London: In action: Paul Harding from Living History dressed as a Roman soldier who will be on hand throughout the open day. 38014202.

7. There is a 400-year-old Lebanon cedar tree still growing by Quadrant House. There were others planted in the area that gave nearby Cedar Road its name.

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8. Henry VIII built a walled hare warren to provide animals for hunting. Parts of the wall still remain in south Cheam, including in Warren Avenue. Holes can still be seen at the base of the wall. These were used when hares were wanted. Servants would open the hatches and chase hares through the holes into nets on the other side.

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9. The groundsman's hut at Sutton Cricket Club used to be the main building at Sutton station until the station was modernised and the building was dismantled and relocated.

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10. The Rolling Stones played a gig in a Sutton town centre pub in the 60s - to find out which one take one of Chas Bailey's walking tours, starting from the crossroads by Caffe Nero in Sutton town centre every Thursday at 3pm from May 1 to August 28.

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Comments (4)

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2:04pm Thu 17 Apr 14

anconky says...

A couple of corrections

a) Croydon Airport was never a fighter base. It remained civilian for most of the way, and only being taken over by the RAF in 1944 by the Transport Command division. The roads were named with links to aviation rather than directly with the airfield. E.g. Lindburgh, Alcock and Brown closes are people well known in aviation history, but none flew from Croydon. Vulcan way was named after the Avro Vulcan which never flew from Croydon and had no connection with it.

b) The Rolling Stones played a few locations in Sutton - apart from the one you imply (which I won't spoil the surprise) they also played in Cheam, and one of their first ever gigs was at the Woodstock at Stonecot Hill.
A couple of corrections a) Croydon Airport was never a fighter base. It remained civilian for most of the way, and only being taken over by the RAF in 1944 by the Transport Command division. The roads were named with links to aviation rather than directly with the airfield. E.g. Lindburgh, Alcock and Brown closes are people well known in aviation history, but none flew from Croydon. Vulcan way was named after the Avro Vulcan which never flew from Croydon and had no connection with it. b) The Rolling Stones played a few locations in Sutton - apart from the one you imply (which I won't spoil the surprise) they also played in Cheam, and one of their first ever gigs was at the Woodstock at Stonecot Hill. anconky
  • Score: 2

11:30pm Thu 17 Apr 14

Justcos says...

anconky wrote:
A couple of corrections

a) Croydon Airport was never a fighter base. It remained civilian for most of the way, and only being taken over by the RAF in 1944 by the Transport Command division. The roads were named with links to aviation rather than directly with the airfield. E.g. Lindburgh, Alcock and Brown closes are people well known in aviation history, but none flew from Croydon. Vulcan way was named after the Avro Vulcan which never flew from Croydon and had no connection with it.

b) The Rolling Stones played a few locations in Sutton - apart from the one you imply (which I won't spoil the surprise) they also played in Cheam, and one of their first ever gigs was at the Woodstock at Stonecot Hill.
You may want to correct Wikipedia too. It states 'When the Second World War started in September 1939, Croydon Airport was closed to civil aviation but played a vital role as a fighter station during the Battle of Britain.'!
[quote][p][bold]anconky[/bold] wrote: A couple of corrections a) Croydon Airport was never a fighter base. It remained civilian for most of the way, and only being taken over by the RAF in 1944 by the Transport Command division. The roads were named with links to aviation rather than directly with the airfield. E.g. Lindburgh, Alcock and Brown closes are people well known in aviation history, but none flew from Croydon. Vulcan way was named after the Avro Vulcan which never flew from Croydon and had no connection with it. b) The Rolling Stones played a few locations in Sutton - apart from the one you imply (which I won't spoil the surprise) they also played in Cheam, and one of their first ever gigs was at the Woodstock at Stonecot Hill.[/p][/quote]You may want to correct Wikipedia too. It states 'When the Second World War started in September 1939, Croydon Airport was closed to civil aviation but played a vital role as a fighter station during the Battle of Britain.'! Justcos
  • Score: 5

2:43pm Fri 18 Apr 14

Sutton53 says...

anconky - a couple of corrections for you:

1. Charles Lindbergh, flew into Croydon in 1927, shortly after completing the first solo trans-Atlantic flight;

2. A few days before war was declared in September 1939, Croydon Airport was closed to civil aviation, and became instead an RAF fighter station. 'Lord Haw Haw', on German radio, warned: 'Croydon must beware. She is the second line of defence. We know the aerodrome is camouflaged, but we know just what kind of camouflage it is. We shall bomb it and bomb it to a finish.'

As a fighter station, Croydon played a front-line role in the Battle of Britain, and was also regularly visited by high-ranking dignitaries. On 15 August 1940, it became a target during the first major raid of the war on the London area: the neighbouring factories of British NSF, Bourjois and Redwing were severely damaged, and six airmen and over sixty civilians were killed. In 1944, Croydon became the London base for RAF Transport Command, and in this role began to see use again by civil aircraft. In February 1946, the airport was finally handed back by the RAF to civilian control.

(above from Croydon Online website - http://www.croydonon
line.org/history/pla
ces/airports.asp).
anconky - a couple of corrections for you: 1. Charles Lindbergh, flew into Croydon in 1927, shortly after completing the first solo trans-Atlantic flight; 2. A few days before war was declared in September 1939, Croydon Airport was closed to civil aviation, and became instead an RAF fighter station. 'Lord Haw Haw', on German radio, warned: 'Croydon must beware. She is the second line of defence. We know the aerodrome is camouflaged, but we know just what kind of camouflage it is. We shall bomb it and bomb it to a finish.' As a fighter station, Croydon played a front-line role in the Battle of Britain, and was also regularly visited by high-ranking dignitaries. On 15 August 1940, it became a target during the first major raid of the war on the London area: the neighbouring factories of British NSF, Bourjois and Redwing were severely damaged, and six airmen and over sixty civilians were killed. In 1944, Croydon became the London base for RAF Transport Command, and in this role began to see use again by civil aircraft. In February 1946, the airport was finally handed back by the RAF to civilian control. (above from Croydon Online website - http://www.croydonon line.org/history/pla ces/airports.asp). Sutton53
  • Score: 1

5:08pm Sun 20 Apr 14

Launchballer says...

I'm sorry that I don't share your slavish attachment with surprise. That final pub you describe was named on the front page of Wikipedia several weeks ago.
I'm sorry that I don't share your slavish attachment with surprise. That final pub you describe was named on the front page of Wikipedia several weeks ago. Launchballer
  • Score: -2

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