PICTURED: Self confessed 'couch potato' drops five dress sizes with the help of her mum

This Is Local London: Helen Baker said she gained weight after taking medication for her migranes which made her balloon from a size 14 to 20. Helen Baker said she gained weight after taking medication for her migranes which made her balloon from a size 14 to 20.

A self confessed 'couch potato' has dropped five dress sizes to become half the woman she was with the help of the mum.

Helen Baker, 43, of Herbert Road, Bexleyheath decided to do something about her weight after she ballooned up to a size 20 weighing 13 stone.

Ms Baker was spurred on by her mum Barbara Baker, 66, who kept telling her to try and lose weight.

After joining Weight Watchers together nearly two years the mother and daughter have lost a combined seven stone- Helen is now a size 10 and Barbara is down to a 12 from an 18.

Ms Baker used to suffer from severe migraines and the medication she was prescribed meant she ballooned from a size 14 to 20 in two years.

Ms Baker said: "My pictures were appallingly before I went to Weight Watchers, it took a while for me to kickstart myself.

"I was always a bit of a couch potato but I was quite active when I was younger so it didn't really matter.

"After I was put on the migraine tablets my weight ballooned and having a stressful office job didn't help.

"When I finally got to Weight Watchers and was weighed I was just mortified.

"Just before that mum and I joined the gym but we only went once in three months.

"Mum the convinced me to try the local class in Pickford Lane and before I could finish my sentence I had my coat on and was out the door.

"It has been a journey we have been on together and we are really proud of each other.

"Mum did it more to encourage me and it was a bit of healthy competition."

The mother and daughter, who live together, have also rehauled their diets and swapped coffee and cakes for porridge and bananas.

Ms Baker added: "My meals used to be massive and we have really cut down the size of our meals.

"Lunch is now a wrap with fish and ham and dinner is normally meat and vegetables.

"We have both reached our target weight and are still going to Weight Watchers to make sure we maintain it and now we help lead the group."

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:06pm Tue 18 Mar 14

sarfflondonbird says...

Well done. Are you thinking of starting a class of your own now?
Well done. Are you thinking of starting a class of your own now? sarfflondonbird
  • Score: 17

1:05pm Tue 18 Mar 14

derekhope says...

Yes Yes Yes. I understand the story. It does however beg the question. If the medication caused the weight gain, was the medication stopped? If so it would mean the Weight Watchers programme was not required. If the medication was not stopped it wasn't the medication that caused the weight gain. If the medication has been stopped, was this on the advice of Weight Watchers and have the migraine attacks now returned. Nice plug for Weight Watchers, but doesn't ring true overall.
Yes Yes Yes. I understand the story. It does however beg the question. If the medication caused the weight gain, was the medication stopped? If so it would mean the Weight Watchers programme was not required. If the medication was not stopped it wasn't the medication that caused the weight gain. If the medication has been stopped, was this on the advice of Weight Watchers and have the migraine attacks now returned. Nice plug for Weight Watchers, but doesn't ring true overall. derekhope
  • Score: 3

1:22pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Dr. Nick says...

derekhope wrote:
Yes Yes Yes. I understand the story. It does however beg the question. If the medication caused the weight gain, was the medication stopped? If so it would mean the Weight Watchers programme was not required. If the medication was not stopped it wasn't the medication that caused the weight gain. If the medication has been stopped, was this on the advice of Weight Watchers and have the migraine attacks now returned. Nice plug for Weight Watchers, but doesn't ring true overall.
Lots of standard medication causes weight gain over a period of time - this is because they effect the three fluid compartments within the body; the fluid inside cells/cytoplasm (25ltr), the fluid between cells/interstitial fluid (12ltr) and the fluid in blood plasma (3ltr). These figures are for a 70kg male, can't remember offhand the female ones. Upsetting the balance within one compartment will trigger weight gain, especially via Oedema. Most medications will do this over a period of time, even paracetamol. One of the worst medications are anti-psychotics as they more more fluid more quickly. Hormone medications are the next in line as they trigger changes with the whole body rather than just one area. Biology 101.

So most medications will cause it over a period of time and if she has managed to stop taking the medication it will have contributed to her weight loss.
[quote][p][bold]derekhope[/bold] wrote: Yes Yes Yes. I understand the story. It does however beg the question. If the medication caused the weight gain, was the medication stopped? If so it would mean the Weight Watchers programme was not required. If the medication was not stopped it wasn't the medication that caused the weight gain. If the medication has been stopped, was this on the advice of Weight Watchers and have the migraine attacks now returned. Nice plug for Weight Watchers, but doesn't ring true overall.[/p][/quote]Lots of standard medication causes weight gain over a period of time - this is because they effect the three fluid compartments within the body; the fluid inside cells/cytoplasm (25ltr), the fluid between cells/interstitial fluid (12ltr) and the fluid in blood plasma (3ltr). These figures are for a 70kg male, can't remember offhand the female ones. Upsetting the balance within one compartment will trigger weight gain, especially via Oedema. Most medications will do this over a period of time, even paracetamol. One of the worst medications are anti-psychotics as they more more fluid more quickly. Hormone medications are the next in line as they trigger changes with the whole body rather than just one area. Biology 101. So most medications will cause it over a period of time and if she has managed to stop taking the medication it will have contributed to her weight loss. Dr. Nick
  • Score: -11

7:27pm Thu 20 Mar 14

Dr dave 2000 says...

Dr. Nick wrote:
derekhope wrote:
Yes Yes Yes. I understand the story. It does however beg the question. If the medication caused the weight gain, was the medication stopped? If so it would mean the Weight Watchers programme was not required. If the medication was not stopped it wasn't the medication that caused the weight gain. If the medication has been stopped, was this on the advice of Weight Watchers and have the migraine attacks now returned. Nice plug for Weight Watchers, but doesn't ring true overall.
Lots of standard medication causes weight gain over a period of time - this is because they effect the three fluid compartments within the body; the fluid inside cells/cytoplasm (25ltr), the fluid between cells/interstitial fluid (12ltr) and the fluid in blood plasma (3ltr). These figures are for a 70kg male, can't remember offhand the female ones. Upsetting the balance within one compartment will trigger weight gain, especially via Oedema. Most medications will do this over a period of time, even paracetamol. One of the worst medications are anti-psychotics as they more more fluid more quickly. Hormone medications are the next in line as they trigger changes with the whole body rather than just one area. Biology 101.

So most medications will cause it over a period of time and if she has managed to stop taking the medication it will have contributed to her weight loss.
Good on you .The weight she did put on before she stopped the meds she still need to loose.so well done to you both.and dr nick as a dr should you not congratulate people for there hard work so they don't cost the N H S money .
[quote][p][bold]Dr. Nick[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]derekhope[/bold] wrote: Yes Yes Yes. I understand the story. It does however beg the question. If the medication caused the weight gain, was the medication stopped? If so it would mean the Weight Watchers programme was not required. If the medication was not stopped it wasn't the medication that caused the weight gain. If the medication has been stopped, was this on the advice of Weight Watchers and have the migraine attacks now returned. Nice plug for Weight Watchers, but doesn't ring true overall.[/p][/quote]Lots of standard medication causes weight gain over a period of time - this is because they effect the three fluid compartments within the body; the fluid inside cells/cytoplasm (25ltr), the fluid between cells/interstitial fluid (12ltr) and the fluid in blood plasma (3ltr). These figures are for a 70kg male, can't remember offhand the female ones. Upsetting the balance within one compartment will trigger weight gain, especially via Oedema. Most medications will do this over a period of time, even paracetamol. One of the worst medications are anti-psychotics as they more more fluid more quickly. Hormone medications are the next in line as they trigger changes with the whole body rather than just one area. Biology 101. So most medications will cause it over a period of time and if she has managed to stop taking the medication it will have contributed to her weight loss.[/p][/quote]Good on you .The weight she did put on before she stopped the meds she still need to loose.so well done to you both.and dr nick as a dr should you not congratulate people for there hard work so they don't cost the N H S money . Dr dave 2000
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree