PICTURED: London's ghostly past revealed through the free Streetmuseum app

This Is Local London: Duncannon Street, Westminster in 1902. Courtesy of Museum of London Duncannon Street, Westminster in 1902. Courtesy of Museum of London

Ghostly images of London’s history can be revealed with an updated Smartphone app showing how the streets looked more than 100 years ago.

The Museum of London’s multi award-winning app, Streetmuseum, has been refreshed with over 100 new locations and images, ranging from 1868 to 2003.

The app allows users to select a destination from a London map or use geo-tagging and Google Maps to pinpoint their location.

Once selected, a historical image of their London location appears onscreen, which can be expanded and explored along with historical information about the subject.

Images include the view of London’s skyline from Tower Bridge in the 1930s, Victoria Station in 1950 and Brick Lane in 1957.

Streetmuseum 2.0, developed with creative agency Brothers and Sisters, guides users to sites across London, where hidden histories of the city are revealed through the Museum of London’s art and photographic collections.

Top five ghostly hybrid shots

1. Gloucester Road Station in 1868
Courtesy of Museum of London

This Is Local London: London's ghostly past revealed through free museum app

This shot taken by Henry Flather shows the completed Gloucester Road Station on the underground Metropolitan and District Railway, which was earlier that year.

Construction was by the 'cut-and-cover' method used to build the first underground railways before the development of the tunnelling shield by James Henry Greathead.

2. Cheapside in 1893
Courtesy of the Estate of Paul Martin

This photograph, taken by Paul Martin, shows a street seller of sherbert and water in Cheapside. He is completely unaware of the camera.

Paul Martin was the first photographer to roam around the streets of London with a disguised camera taking candid pictures to show everyday life.

This Is Local London: London's ghostly past revealed through free museum app


3. Oxford Street circa 1905
Courtesy of Museum of London

This Is Local London: London's ghostly past revealed through free museum app

Christina Broom captured people and traffic in Oxford Street around the turn of the 20th century.

4. Duncannon Street, Westminster in 1902
Courtesy of Museum of London

This Is Local London: London's ghostly past revealed through free museum app

This shot by an unknown photographer shows the street bunting and banners for the coronation ceremony of Edward VII.

There are pedestrians and vehicles in the foreground and the National Gallery is visible in the distance.

5. Tower Bridge circa 1930
Courtesy of Museum of London

This Is Local London: London's ghostly past revealed through free museum app

Photographer George Davison Reid has captured the view from the west side of Tower Bridge, The children appeared in other photos at different riverside locations and it is thought they could be Reid's daughters.

Read about the hidden history of the Thames uncovered by a Museum of London Docklands expert here.

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