Paediatrician joins fight to lower speed limit on the East End Road, Finchley

Dr Daniels wants to see the speed limit on the East End Road reduced to 20mph

Dr Daniels wants to see the speed limit on the East End Road reduced to 20mph

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A paediatrician who treats the victims of car accidents is urging Barnet Borough Council to consider lowering the speed limit on a “hazardous” stretch of road.

Justin Daniels, of Manor View, Finchley, believes the limit on East End Road should be reduced from 30mph to 20mph and has vowed to fight his cause to the bitter end.

There are currently two primary schools and two high schools in the area, and children regularly get knocked down by cars during the busy rush hour.

He said: “My children walk to the bus stop to go to school and I worry about them every day. That shouldn’t be the case in the age we live in.

“Children can easily slip out of their parents' hands and run into the road for something - and by that point it’s too late.

“When it comes to our children, we can never be too careful. It’s a hazardous road and can be very dangerous.”

Father to three young boys, Dr Daniels has spent hours researching figures to support his claims.

Statistics show that between 2006 and 2011, there were 38 collisions, four child casualties, eight pedestrian casualties and two cyclist casualties on the road.

In 2009, Barnet had the highest number of road deaths out of all London boroughs, and the second highest number of accidents.

At 20mph, 2.5 per cent of accidents prove fatal - but at 30 mph more than 20 per cent of accidents result in death.

He added: “I'm pleased the council are looking into this. Just last week a little boy was injured by a car. Luckily he wasn’t badly hurt, but it was a scary reminder of what could be.

“As a paediatrician, I spend a lot of time in A&E. Injuries from people being hit by cars have tremendously devastating effects.

“We must take action before it is too late.”

Mothers in Barnet and Haringey have also launched the Walksafe petition, urging for a lower speed limit around Coppetts Wood Primary School, Friern Barnet, and Coldfall School, Muswell Hill.

Barnet Borough Council’s specially formed Task and Finish Group will spend the coming months examining the effects of similar schemes in other boroughs.

They will also study statistics on whether crashes and pedestrian injuries are reduced, and present its findings to the council’s cabinet committee in April.

Councillor Kate Salinger, chairman of the task and finish group, said: “There is a good deal of work to be done and it is very important that the council gets it right.

“Four petitions have been handed into council from people who live around certain schools in the borough asking that the area around each school be made a 20 mph limit area. We need to have a borough wide policy that works for all.”

   

Comments (8)

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10:26pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Mr V Cold says...

Wish i could do 20 mph on East End Road
Wish i could do 20 mph on East End Road Mr V Cold
  • Score: 2

10:28pm Fri 24 Jan 14

nlygo says...

20 miles an hour going uphill on East End Road would only add to the level of pollution. sometimes people just dont think through what happens with lower speed limits on some roads

traffic calming measures and radar speed signs are a much better alternative on this road
20 miles an hour going uphill on East End Road would only add to the level of pollution. sometimes people just dont think through what happens with lower speed limits on some roads traffic calming measures and radar speed signs are a much better alternative on this road nlygo
  • Score: 2

5:52pm Sat 25 Jan 14

Jon10 says...

nlygo wrote:
20 miles an hour going uphill on East End Road would only add to the level of pollution. sometimes people just dont think through what happens with lower speed limits on some roads

traffic calming measures and radar speed signs are a much better alternative on this road
I think all side roads in the borough should be 20mph, but this is a through road.

More appropriate would be to add segregated cycle paths either side (meaning not just white paint, but proper kerbs) and make the traffic lanes narrower, therefore. That would immediately slow down the traffic, except outside busy periods. Even avoid painting a central white line - it all helps to make motorists have to consider traffic coming the other way, instead of ignoring it.
[quote][p][bold]nlygo[/bold] wrote: 20 miles an hour going uphill on East End Road would only add to the level of pollution. sometimes people just dont think through what happens with lower speed limits on some roads traffic calming measures and radar speed signs are a much better alternative on this road[/p][/quote]I think all side roads in the borough should be 20mph, but this is a through road. More appropriate would be to add segregated cycle paths either side (meaning not just white paint, but proper kerbs) and make the traffic lanes narrower, therefore. That would immediately slow down the traffic, except outside busy periods. Even avoid painting a central white line - it all helps to make motorists have to consider traffic coming the other way, instead of ignoring it. Jon10
  • Score: 0

11:16am Fri 31 Jan 14

Edgar de Jarnac says...

". . . children regularly get knocked down by cars during the busy rush hour."

Any child who regularly gets knocked down needs road safety lessons.
". . . children regularly get knocked down by cars during the busy rush hour." Any child who regularly gets knocked down needs road safety lessons. Edgar de Jarnac
  • Score: 0

11:26am Fri 31 Jan 14

Edgar de Jarnac says...

"In 2009, Barnet had the highest number of road deaths out of all London boroughs, and the second highest number of accidents."

But, according to the 2011 census, Barnet also has the second largest population of any London borough (356,000), just behind Croydon (363,000). So, because it has more residents than all but one other boroughs, one might expect it to have one of the highest numbers of accidents. More useful statistic might be the number of accidents per 1000 population or the number of accidents per mile of road.
"In 2009, Barnet had the highest number of road deaths out of all London boroughs, and the second highest number of accidents." But, according to the 2011 census, Barnet also has the second largest population of any London borough (356,000), just behind Croydon (363,000). So, because it has more residents than all but one other boroughs, one might expect it to have one of the highest numbers of accidents. More useful statistic might be the number of accidents per 1000 population or the number of accidents per mile of road. Edgar de Jarnac
  • Score: 1

11:33am Fri 31 Jan 14

Edgar de Jarnac says...

I'm not against measures to reduce road accidents, but schemes that slow traffic also lead to an increase in the level of noxious exhaust fumes, thereby killing local residents in other ways.
I'm not against measures to reduce road accidents, but schemes that slow traffic also lead to an increase in the level of noxious exhaust fumes, thereby killing local residents in other ways. Edgar de Jarnac
  • Score: 1

3:27pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Not that Dave, another one. says...

I think that if lower speed limits are introduced for some residential areas and near schools, I think it only sensible that the blocked off roads and turning restrictions of previous generations are reviewed so that a proper road network is restored. Channelling traffic into just one route and then reducing the speed it operates at would cause unnecessary congestion and ensuing pollution.
If you compare with say the USA where many residential areas have 20mph limits, you don't also find lots of one-way streets and dead ends to go with it.
I think that if lower speed limits are introduced for some residential areas and near schools, I think it only sensible that the blocked off roads and turning restrictions of previous generations are reviewed so that a proper road network is restored. Channelling traffic into just one route and then reducing the speed it operates at would cause unnecessary congestion and ensuing pollution. If you compare with say the USA where many residential areas have 20mph limits, you don't also find lots of one-way streets and dead ends to go with it. Not that Dave, another one.
  • Score: 0

8:10pm Sun 2 Feb 14

Edgar de Jarnac says...

Simply reducing the official speed limit from 30mph to 20mph is not the answer.

It may well be that only 2.5 per cent of accidents at 20mph result in death, compared with more than 20 per cent at 30mph. But in practice cutting the speed limit by 10mph hardly reduces average speeds at all. A study by the Traffic Research Laboratory found that lowering the speed limit from 30mph to 20mph resulted in an average speed reduction of a mere 2mph.

Average speeds can be reduced significantly only by imposing various additional traffic calming measures such as speed humps and width restrictions. Unfortunately, while concentrating on negotiating such hindrances, drivers are less likely to notice a child who runs out into the road.

To my mind the best solution to the problem is better road safety education for schoolchildren and their parents.
Simply reducing the official speed limit from 30mph to 20mph is not the answer. It may well be that only 2.5 per cent of accidents at 20mph result in death, compared with more than 20 per cent at 30mph. But in practice cutting the speed limit by 10mph hardly reduces average speeds at all. A study by the Traffic Research Laboratory found that lowering the speed limit from 30mph to 20mph resulted in an average speed reduction of a mere 2mph. Average speeds can be reduced significantly only by imposing various additional traffic calming measures such as speed humps and width restrictions. Unfortunately, while concentrating on negotiating such hindrances, drivers are less likely to notice a child who runs out into the road. To my mind the best solution to the problem is better road safety education for schoolchildren and their parents. Edgar de Jarnac
  • Score: 0

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