The Metropolitan Police Service is extending Operation Safeway to "keep commuters safe"

Cycling safety campaign extended

Cycling safety campaign extended

First published in News
Last updated
This Is Local London: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter, covering Walthamstow, Leyton and Leytonstone. Call me on 07768 507 739

The Metropolitan Police Service has extended its safety campaign for cyclists after handing out 13,818 fixed penalty notices and reports for traffic offences in just six weeks.

Operation Safeway was launched in November in response to a series of cyclists’ deaths in the capital.

Although the campaign was supposed to come to an end last week, the MPS has announced that it will continue into 2014 as commuters return to work.
 

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10:29am Mon 6 Jan 14

sahw says...

You don't mention that the initiative started on 25 November. 13,818 FPN and other reports in six weeks clearly demonstrates the poor road sense of many road users (including cyclists).

Some cycling groups criticised the earlier operation for targeting the wrong priorities in advising over helmets and high vis, arguing that not only are their benefits partly unproven, but it sends an implicit message that riders are somehow to blame irrespective of the circumstances of an incident. But that response ignores the duty of (their own) care by many cyclists.

Too many cyclists ride at night without lights (illegal) and wearing dark clothing. In winter months, particularly, this is hardly responsible behaviour. The same can be said of cyclists using pavements and riding the wrong way on one-way streets. Some one-way streets in Walthamstow have been designated two-way for cyclists, but not all. Cyclists should be aware that travelling along or emerging the wrong way from a non designated one-way street puts them at risk of injury or death. There is also the risk of collision with pedestrian who are not expecting traffic of any kind travelling in the wrong direction in those streets.
You don't mention that the initiative started on 25 November. 13,818 FPN and other reports in six weeks clearly demonstrates the poor road sense of many road users (including cyclists). Some cycling groups criticised the earlier operation for targeting the wrong priorities in advising over helmets and high vis, arguing that not only are their benefits partly unproven, but it sends an implicit message that riders are somehow to blame irrespective of the circumstances of an incident. But that response ignores the duty of (their own) care by many cyclists. Too many cyclists ride at night without lights (illegal) and wearing dark clothing. In winter months, particularly, this is hardly responsible behaviour. The same can be said of cyclists using pavements and riding the wrong way on one-way streets. Some one-way streets in Walthamstow have been designated two-way for cyclists, but not all. Cyclists should be aware that travelling along or emerging the wrong way from a non designated one-way street puts them at risk of injury or death. There is also the risk of collision with pedestrian who are not expecting traffic of any kind travelling in the wrong direction in those streets. sahw
  • Score: 0

11:55am Mon 6 Jan 14

PsiMonk says...

While cyclists who break road rules are undoubtedly an annoyance, they statistically rarely are a danger to themselves or others.

That is why cyclists were angry for being targeted at all, let alone for perfectly legal behaviour (such as not wearing high vis or a helmet, even in one case riding a Backfiets bike with kids in). It even emerged the Met had quotas for officers to fine cyclists but not other road users.

In short, no one denies cyclists have a duty of care. But when a huge TRL study of thousands of UK collisions showed in 74% of cycle-motor vehicle collisions the driver was majority at fault, and in just 6% was the cyclist doing something reckless or illegal, it makes little sense, in trying to improve cyclist safety, to go after poor cycling. Drivers, particularly HGV drivers, particularly tipper truck drivers, should be the main target of any such operation. And they weren't.
While cyclists who break road rules are undoubtedly an annoyance, they statistically rarely are a danger to themselves or others. That is why cyclists were angry for being targeted at all, let alone for perfectly legal behaviour (such as not wearing high vis or a helmet, even in one case riding a Backfiets bike with kids in). It even emerged the Met had quotas for officers to fine cyclists but not other road users. In short, no one denies cyclists have a duty of care. But when a huge TRL study of thousands of UK collisions showed in 74% of cycle-motor vehicle collisions the driver was majority at fault, and in just 6% was the cyclist doing something reckless or illegal, it makes little sense, in trying to improve cyclist safety, to go after poor cycling. Drivers, particularly HGV drivers, particularly tipper truck drivers, should be the main target of any such operation. And they weren't. PsiMonk
  • Score: 7

5:13pm Mon 6 Jan 14

myopinioncounts says...

What about this report in a national newspaper only today!
A cyclist has been jailed for a year after he fled the scene when he almost killed a young girl.
Philip Benwell, 38, crashed into nine-year-old Leila Crofts at a pedestrian crossing when the lights were on red in Bournemouth, Dorset, last July.
Leila was knocked unconscious in the collision as she headed to the beach with her au pair. But Benwell continued cycling as the girl was taken to hospital with serious head injuries and fought for her life in intensive care.
Benwell, who was cycling downhill at the time of the crash, came off his bike but then picked it up and walked off.

Read more: http://www.dailymail
.co.uk/news/article-
2534697/Cyclist-jail
ed-knocking-girl-nin
e-went-red-light-ped
estrian-crossing-lea
ving-head-injuries.h
tml#ixzz2pdhWpUtP
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
What about this report in a national newspaper only today! A cyclist has been jailed for a year after he fled the scene when he almost killed a young girl. Philip Benwell, 38, crashed into nine-year-old Leila Crofts at a pedestrian crossing when the lights were on red in Bournemouth, Dorset, last July. Leila was knocked unconscious in the collision as she headed to the beach with her au pair. But Benwell continued cycling as the girl was taken to hospital with serious head injuries and fought for her life in intensive care. Benwell, who was cycling downhill at the time of the crash, came off his bike but then picked it up and walked off. Read more: http://www.dailymail .co.uk/news/article- 2534697/Cyclist-jail ed-knocking-girl-nin e-went-red-light-ped estrian-crossing-lea ving-head-injuries.h tml#ixzz2pdhWpUtP Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook myopinioncounts
  • Score: 1

6:22pm Mon 6 Jan 14

PsiMonk says...

Except... How many little girls were run over and injured by motorists the same year? That is the point about statistical likelihoods!

There are bad cyclists, there are bad drivers. The question is where should police be putting their limited resources to get the best safety boost. The evidence overwhelmingly points to HGV drivers particularly, and drivers over cyclists more generally. Statistically that is more likely to net not only serious law breaking, but also dangerous road behaviour.
Except... How many little girls were run over and injured by motorists the same year? That is the point about statistical likelihoods! There are bad cyclists, there are bad drivers. The question is where should police be putting their limited resources to get the best safety boost. The evidence overwhelmingly points to HGV drivers particularly, and drivers over cyclists more generally. Statistically that is more likely to net not only serious law breaking, but also dangerous road behaviour. PsiMonk
  • Score: 4

9:52pm Mon 6 Jan 14

sahw says...

I was a cyclist from the 1950s and a motor cyclist from the 1960s. As a cyclist (no cycling proficiency training in those days) I overtook a lorry on the inside in slow moving traffic. The driver moved to the left to allow a bus to pass in the opposite direction and I ended up on the pavement. I didn't do that again, nor did I consider it was necessarily the lorry driver's fault.

With journeys to work and "social" rides, I expect I have cycled and motorcycled more than fifty thousand miles in my lifetime but that was my worst experience in all that travelling on two wheels. It's called "defensive" rather than "offensive" cycling.

If cyclists ensured that they and their machine were visible at all times, many accidents involving cyclists simply would not happen. Moaning about being "advised by the police about hi-viz clothing and helmets" when it is "not a legal requirement" won't get the job done.

You take you life in your hands when you cycle. Give yourself a sporting chance of survival by fitting and using lights on your bike (a legal requirement) and wear hi-viz clothing.
I was a cyclist from the 1950s and a motor cyclist from the 1960s. As a cyclist (no cycling proficiency training in those days) I overtook a lorry on the inside in slow moving traffic. The driver moved to the left to allow a bus to pass in the opposite direction and I ended up on the pavement. I didn't do that again, nor did I consider it was necessarily the lorry driver's fault. With journeys to work and "social" rides, I expect I have cycled and motorcycled more than fifty thousand miles in my lifetime but that was my worst experience in all that travelling on two wheels. It's called "defensive" rather than "offensive" cycling. If cyclists ensured that they and their machine were visible at all times, many accidents involving cyclists simply would not happen. Moaning about being "advised by the police about hi-viz clothing and helmets" when it is "not a legal requirement" won't get the job done. You take you life in your hands when you cycle. Give yourself a sporting chance of survival by fitting and using lights on your bike (a legal requirement) and wear hi-viz clothing. sahw
  • Score: 1

11:05pm Mon 6 Jan 14

PsiMonk says...

I am not moaning. But the vast majority of cyclists killed or seriously injured on London streets were, according to the best data anyone has, doing sod all wrong. They were wearing high vis and helmets, they weren't wearing headphones, they weren't riding up the inside of a lorry, they weren't running a red light.

So... Again... Concentrating valuable police resources on riders who do not wear high vis, even on riders who do ride illegally, is not likely to cut injuries or fatalities in any major way. And a continued focus on that by you and/ or the police is simply victim blaming.

Removing substandard HGVs and tipper trucks, illegal drivers etc. from our roads would be more simply effective. The recent police campaign found a third of HGVs stopped were not roadworthy - drivers over hours, unsafe loads, mirrors missing etc. Yes, a third! If you want to cut deaths and injuries, your refusal to face that simple issue looks mighty strange.
I am not moaning. But the vast majority of cyclists killed or seriously injured on London streets were, according to the best data anyone has, doing sod all wrong. They were wearing high vis and helmets, they weren't wearing headphones, they weren't riding up the inside of a lorry, they weren't running a red light. So... Again... Concentrating valuable police resources on riders who do not wear high vis, even on riders who do ride illegally, is not likely to cut injuries or fatalities in any major way. And a continued focus on that by you and/ or the police is simply victim blaming. Removing substandard HGVs and tipper trucks, illegal drivers etc. from our roads would be more simply effective. The recent police campaign found a third of HGVs stopped were not roadworthy - drivers over hours, unsafe loads, mirrors missing etc. Yes, a third! If you want to cut deaths and injuries, your refusal to face that simple issue looks mighty strange. PsiMonk
  • Score: 4

9:55am Tue 7 Jan 14

Richard of Wantage says...

myopinioncounts wrote:
What about this report in a national newspaper only today!
A cyclist has been jailed for a year after he fled the scene when he almost killed a young girl.
Philip Benwell, 38, crashed into nine-year-old Leila Crofts at a pedestrian crossing when the lights were on red in Bournemouth, Dorset, last July.
Leila was knocked unconscious in the collision as she headed to the beach with her au pair. But Benwell continued cycling as the girl was taken to hospital with serious head injuries and fought for her life in intensive care.
Benwell, who was cycling downhill at the time of the crash, came off his bike but then picked it up and walked off.

Read more: http://www.dailymail

.co.uk/news/article-

2534697/Cyclist-jail

ed-knocking-girl-nin

e-went-red-light-ped

estrian-crossing-lea

ving-head-injuries.h

tml#ixzz2pdhWpUtP
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
What a stupid cyclist, but there again if they were to write about every stupid motorist their paper would be a telephone book thick.
[quote][p][bold]myopinioncounts[/bold] wrote: What about this report in a national newspaper only today! A cyclist has been jailed for a year after he fled the scene when he almost killed a young girl. Philip Benwell, 38, crashed into nine-year-old Leila Crofts at a pedestrian crossing when the lights were on red in Bournemouth, Dorset, last July. Leila was knocked unconscious in the collision as she headed to the beach with her au pair. But Benwell continued cycling as the girl was taken to hospital with serious head injuries and fought for her life in intensive care. Benwell, who was cycling downhill at the time of the crash, came off his bike but then picked it up and walked off. Read more: http://www.dailymail .co.uk/news/article- 2534697/Cyclist-jail ed-knocking-girl-nin e-went-red-light-ped estrian-crossing-lea ving-head-injuries.h tml#ixzz2pdhWpUtP Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook[/p][/quote]What a stupid cyclist, but there again if they were to write about every stupid motorist their paper would be a telephone book thick. Richard of Wantage
  • Score: 3

1:01pm Tue 7 Jan 14

Stevo98 says...

This is why I think the police banging on about hi vis is annoying:

The lorry driver who killed cyclist Catriona Patel was drunk and chatting on a mobile.

The lorry driver who killed Eilidh Cairns had faulty eyesight (the police didn't even bother to discover this until the same driver killed another woman.)

The lorry driver who killed cyclist Brian Dorling turned across his path.

The lorry driver who killed cyclist Svetlana Tereschenko was in an unsafe lorry, failing to indicate and chatting on a mobile. The police decided to charge him with..nothing.

The lorry driver who killed cyclist Deep Lee failed to notice her and smashed into her from behind.

The lorry driver that killed cyclist Andrew McNicoll failed to notice him and side swiped him.

The lorry driver that killed cyclist Daniel Cox was in a truck which did not have the correct mirrors and whose driver had pulled into the ASL on a red light and was indicating in the opposite direction to which he turned.

Two thirds of the lorries stopped by the police under Operation Safeway were breaking the law. Fourteen were considered so dangerous they were immediately taken off the road.
This is why I think the police banging on about hi vis is annoying: The lorry driver who killed cyclist Catriona Patel was drunk and chatting on a mobile. The lorry driver who killed Eilidh Cairns had faulty eyesight (the police didn't even bother to discover this until the same driver killed another woman.) The lorry driver who killed cyclist Brian Dorling turned across his path. The lorry driver who killed cyclist Svetlana Tereschenko was in an unsafe lorry, failing to indicate and chatting on a mobile. The police decided to charge him with..nothing. The lorry driver who killed cyclist Deep Lee failed to notice her and smashed into her from behind. The lorry driver that killed cyclist Andrew McNicoll failed to notice him and side swiped him. The lorry driver that killed cyclist Daniel Cox was in a truck which did not have the correct mirrors and whose driver had pulled into the ASL on a red light and was indicating in the opposite direction to which he turned. Two thirds of the lorries stopped by the police under Operation Safeway were breaking the law. Fourteen were considered so dangerous they were immediately taken off the road. Stevo98
  • Score: 8

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