Mother flagged driver down after ambulance failed to arrive.

This Is Local London: Sajjad Shariff took Fatim Faye to hospital in a W15 bus. Buy this photo » Sajjad Shariff took Fatim Faye to hospital in a W15 bus.

A bus driver is being hailed a hero for pulling over to help a woman going into labour on the side of the road, then rushing her to a hospital when an ambulance failed to show. 

Sajjad Shariff, 41, was driving the W15 bus to Leytonstone station when he noticed a woman staggering towards Grove Green Road bus stop, frantically waving her arms.

“I knew she wasn’t going to make it to the bus stop,” said Mr. Shariff, who pulled the bus over to assist the 44-year-old expectant mother, Fatim Faye, who was in obvious distress.

He added: “She came on and said ‘baby’ and ‘hospital’ and was breathing quickly and heavily. She collapsed on the seat.”

After opening the doors to let passengers off, Mr. Shariff called a ‘code red’, quickly alerting Transport for London’s emergency control room and requesting an ambulance.

Over an hour had passed when Miss Faye’s waters broke on the bus. It was then that Mr. Shariff decided to take the expectant mother to Whipps Cross Hospital himself.

“It was panicky. We didn’t want a baby born on a bus,” joked father-of-three, Mr. Shariff.
He added: “The Depot joked that they should name the baby Enviro200, after the name of the bus.”

Ambulance controllers later claimed that they were mistakenly told that Miss Faye was nine weeks pregnant instead of nine months, so failed to register the call as urgent.

Miss Faye gave birth to a baby girl at 1.45am on December 12 in the maternity ward of Whipps Cross Hospital. Both mother and baby are said to be doing well.

Managing Director for TFL bus operator Tower Transit, Adam Leishman, said: “We’re very proud of Shariff. He’s an admirable guy, always looking to help customers.

“Being a bus driver is often thankless, but it’s a very important function in London. Hopefully this will shine some light on that.”

Comments (5)

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3:11am Sat 21 Dec 13

Billy Yerache says...

Lucky they all spoke the same lingo then.
Lucky they all spoke the same lingo then. Billy Yerache

12:45am Sun 22 Dec 13

SpursSupporter1 says...

I called an ambulance for my daughter when she was in labour 6 months ago but they didn't see it as important anuf and told her too try and make her way too the hospital herself but if she was still in pain in a couple of hours then call them back? Wouldn't wana be having a heart attack would you
I called an ambulance for my daughter when she was in labour 6 months ago but they didn't see it as important anuf and told her too try and make her way too the hospital herself but if she was still in pain in a couple of hours then call them back? Wouldn't wana be having a heart attack would you SpursSupporter1

12:08pm Sun 22 Dec 13

Billy Yerache says...

SpursSupporter1 wrote:
I called an ambulance for my daughter when she was in labour 6 months ago but they didn't see it as important anuf and told her too try and make her way too the hospital herself but if she was still in pain in a couple of hours then call them back? Wouldn't wana be having a heart attack would you
Why would you call an ambulance for a pregnancy? Trouble is people like you use ambulances like a Taxi thus denying them for people who really need them like your heart attack scenario.

Why did you not call a Taxi for your daughter?
[quote][p][bold]SpursSupporter1[/bold] wrote: I called an ambulance for my daughter when she was in labour 6 months ago but they didn't see it as important anuf and told her too try and make her way too the hospital herself but if she was still in pain in a couple of hours then call them back? Wouldn't wana be having a heart attack would you[/p][/quote]Why would you call an ambulance for a pregnancy? Trouble is people like you use ambulances like a Taxi thus denying them for people who really need them like your heart attack scenario. Why did you not call a Taxi for your daughter? Billy Yerache

2:37pm Sun 22 Dec 13

myopinioncounts says...

A parent told the teacher (through an interpreter ) that she had called an ambulance because her 4 year old had hit her 3 year old and made his nose bleed! It is these misuses of 999 that cause more serious calls to be delayed.
A parent told the teacher (through an interpreter ) that she had called an ambulance because her 4 year old had hit her 3 year old and made his nose bleed! It is these misuses of 999 that cause more serious calls to be delayed. myopinioncounts

1:42pm Mon 23 Dec 13

Robert19 says...

My son dislocated his knee on a bus and the ambulance took 50 minutes to get there. The bus driver kept ringing and ringing ambulance control. Yes of course you can cite individual cases of abuse of the system, but there are far too many cases of deaths or added morbidity in part caused by late or no ambulances showing up.
I recently spoke to someone who is an ambulance driver in Saffron Walden. She has to cover all of Hertfordshire and Essex, sometimes Hemel Hempstead one call and the next in Clacton. So no wonder they take their time.
And if you are interested a dislocated knee is not life threatening but causes the most awful pain with any slight movement. But probably another case of misuse of an ambulance to the sympathetic posters above.
My son dislocated his knee on a bus and the ambulance took 50 minutes to get there. The bus driver kept ringing and ringing ambulance control. Yes of course you can cite individual cases of abuse of the system, but there are far too many cases of deaths or added morbidity in part caused by late or no ambulances showing up. I recently spoke to someone who is an ambulance driver in Saffron Walden. She has to cover all of Hertfordshire and Essex, sometimes Hemel Hempstead one call and the next in Clacton. So no wonder they take their time. And if you are interested a dislocated knee is not life threatening but causes the most awful pain with any slight movement. But probably another case of misuse of an ambulance to the sympathetic posters above. Robert19

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