Carshalton and Wallington MP Tom Brake welcomes job boost for young people

This Is Local London: Carshalton and Wallington MP Tom Brake welcomes job boost for young people Carshalton and Wallington MP Tom Brake welcomes job boost for young people

The hunt for jobs could become easier for over 2,000 young people in Sutton as National Insurance Contributions for under 21-years-olds are abolished.

Around 2,960 people in Sutton could benefit as their employer will no longer have to pay contributions.

Businesses could save £1,000 each year for every young employee earning £16,000.

Tom Brake, Carshalton and Wallington MP, said: “This measure will save businesses money and encourage them to take on young employees, creating more opportunities for young local people.”

I want to stay focused on getting young people into work and this is exactly the kind of initiative needed to give businesses a break and encourage them to start recruiting.”

He believes the decision could help build a stronger economy as businesses grow and create more jobs.

Comments (6)

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12:58pm Sun 15 Dec 13

Mr Flange of Wallington says...

What about the over 21s who are deaf to now being discriminated against?

Why would an employer give anyone over 21 a job if it costs them more money?

Daft.
What about the over 21s who are deaf to now being discriminated against? Why would an employer give anyone over 21 a job if it costs them more money? Daft. Mr Flange of Wallington

12:59pm Sun 15 Dec 13

Mr Flange of Wallington says...

Deaf to should read de facto
Deaf to should read de facto Mr Flange of Wallington

10:27pm Sun 15 Dec 13

GreenBrown says...

This won't make much difference. The only way to get young people working again is to get out of the EU and send home all the eastern Europeans doing menial jobs in the country. We have high unemployment in this country, we don't need extra people taking jobs that anyone can do. Not prejudice, not racist, just pure logic.
This won't make much difference. The only way to get young people working again is to get out of the EU and send home all the eastern Europeans doing menial jobs in the country. We have high unemployment in this country, we don't need extra people taking jobs that anyone can do. Not prejudice, not racist, just pure logic. GreenBrown

2:13pm Mon 16 Dec 13

Niki R says...

I've asked Tom repeatedly to enlighten us on how many of the jobs 'created by the Lib Dems' (not businesses, you'll note) are zero hours contracts, part time, mimimum wage or temporary. He never answers. The truth is over half the jobs created by this Government are temporary and part time, leading to underemployment and the exacerbation of the problem of 'the working poor' who toil hard but struggle to make ends meet without benefits subsidising their wages.
I've asked Tom repeatedly to enlighten us on how many of the jobs 'created by the Lib Dems' (not businesses, you'll note) are zero hours contracts, part time, mimimum wage or temporary. He never answers. The truth is over half the jobs created by this Government are temporary and part time, leading to underemployment and the exacerbation of the problem of 'the working poor' who toil hard but struggle to make ends meet without benefits subsidising their wages. Niki R

3:08pm Mon 16 Dec 13

GreenBrown says...

@Niki R

I've just been reading a report from the Nuffield Foundation about the last 3 years of New Labours glorious time in office.....

Winners and Losers in the Crisis: The Changing Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK 2007 – 2010

This updates the 2010 report of the National Equality Panel, and maps out who gained and who lost in the first three years of the recession from 2007 to 2010. I'm cherry picking of course, but that doesn't change the facts.

Poverty for working age people without children rose and there was no real change in overall levels of income inequality, while wage inequalities grew at the top.

"Commenting on the paper Professor Hills said: “Despite being better qualified than previous generations, people in their twenties were worst hit by the financial crisis in terms of unemployment, pay and incomes.”The report shows that among those in their early 20s:

The proportion in full-time employment fell by nine percentage points for men and seven points for women.

Hourly wages fell by more than five per cent for men and women

Weekly full-time earnings fell six per cent for both men and women

Net income fell by 11 per cent before housing costs and 17 per cent after housing costs.

Commenting on this report, Professor Lupton said: “London's economy and labour market were more resilient to the recession than other regions, although there was a rise in people working part-time.

Guess the rise in part time work was also a problem for Labour.

"and the exacerbation of the problem of 'the working poor' who toil hard but struggle to make ends meet without benefits subsidising their wages."

Benefits needed because the housing market was allowed to get out of control by the Labour party and its failure to increase wages to a realistic living wage. How you can berate anyone is beyond me. People in glass houses and all that.
@Niki R I've just been reading a report from the Nuffield Foundation about the last 3 years of New Labours glorious time in office..... Winners and Losers in the Crisis: The Changing Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK 2007 – 2010 This updates the 2010 report of the National Equality Panel, and maps out who gained and who lost in the first three years of the recession from 2007 to 2010. I'm cherry picking of course, but that doesn't change the facts. Poverty for working age people without children rose and there was no real change in overall levels of income inequality, while wage inequalities grew at the top. "Commenting on the paper Professor Hills said: “Despite being better qualified than previous generations, people in their twenties were worst hit by the financial crisis in terms of unemployment, pay and incomes.”The report shows that among those in their early 20s: The proportion in full-time employment fell by nine percentage points for men and seven points for women. Hourly wages fell by more than five per cent for men and women Weekly full-time earnings fell six per cent for both men and women Net income fell by 11 per cent before housing costs and 17 per cent after housing costs. Commenting on this report, Professor Lupton said: “London's economy and labour market were more resilient to the recession than other regions, although there was a rise in people working part-time. Guess the rise in part time work was also a problem for Labour. "and the exacerbation of the problem of 'the working poor' who toil hard but struggle to make ends meet without benefits subsidising their wages." Benefits needed because the housing market was allowed to get out of control by the Labour party and its failure to increase wages to a realistic living wage. How you can berate anyone is beyond me. People in glass houses and all that. GreenBrown

4:23pm Thu 19 Dec 13

Michael Pantlin says...

Niki R wrote:
I've asked Tom repeatedly to enlighten us on how many of the jobs 'created by the Lib Dems' (not businesses, you'll note) are zero hours contracts, part time, mimimum wage or temporary. He never answers. The truth is over half the jobs created by this Government are temporary and part time, leading to underemployment and the exacerbation of the problem of 'the working poor' who toil hard but struggle to make ends meet without benefits subsidising their wages.
The MPs themselves of course have their snouts poised over the trough to receive an 11% pay increase while the rest of us see out income in decline partly due to the coalition's actions and policy eg QE and Money for Lending
[quote][p][bold]Niki R[/bold] wrote: I've asked Tom repeatedly to enlighten us on how many of the jobs 'created by the Lib Dems' (not businesses, you'll note) are zero hours contracts, part time, mimimum wage or temporary. He never answers. The truth is over half the jobs created by this Government are temporary and part time, leading to underemployment and the exacerbation of the problem of 'the working poor' who toil hard but struggle to make ends meet without benefits subsidising their wages.[/p][/quote]The MPs themselves of course have their snouts poised over the trough to receive an 11% pay increase while the rest of us see out income in decline partly due to the coalition's actions and policy eg QE and Money for Lending Michael Pantlin

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