Man convicted of supplying heroin to undercover police officer avoids jail sentence

Darren McLarty of Wessex Close Norbiton sold 20g heroin to an undercover police officer last March

Darren McLarty of Wessex Close Norbiton sold 20g heroin to an undercover police officer last March

First published in News
Last updated
by , Reporter

A man convicted of supplying 20g of heroin to an undercover policeman in a church doorway has been spared jail time despite six previous convictions.

Darren McLarty, 21, from Wessex Close, Norbiton, was found guilty of supplying drugs on March 19 last year, while involved with a gang of 17 men selling crack cocaine and heroin around a Mitcham estate.

He was given an 18-month suspended jail sentence at Kingston Crown Court on June 27, and a 12-month integrated domestic abuse programme on account of his young age and it being a single offence.

He also has to carry out 200 hours of unpaid work. Judge Georgina Kent said: “I find it disturbing you appear to be involved in a number of offences.”

Prosecutor Martin Pinfold said McLarty, along with Brian Mudziwepasi, who is currently serving a jail sentence of 11 years for shooting at officers after the drug deal, were stood in the doorway of a church hall waiting for the undercover officer.

McLarty, who used to work in Sainsbury’s Kingston, has had six previous convictions including possession of cocaine and heroin.

Comments (9)

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12:06pm Mon 1 Jul 13

edstar says...

That will teach him. I bet he wont be back to selling drugs after such a harsh sentence!
That will teach him. I bet he wont be back to selling drugs after such a harsh sentence! edstar
  • Score: 0

12:33pm Mon 1 Jul 13

DB says...

edstar wrote:
That will teach him. I bet he wont be back to selling drugs after such a harsh sentence!
Quite. What exactly does this guy have to do to go to prison?

It is at the stage now where it is not even worth hearing this sort of case at court because the justice system has no power anyway.

At least his partner in crime got 11 years in prison, but I am not sure that seems that much for shooting a police officer in the face!
[quote][p][bold]edstar[/bold] wrote: That will teach him. I bet he wont be back to selling drugs after such a harsh sentence![/p][/quote]Quite. What exactly does this guy have to do to go to prison? It is at the stage now where it is not even worth hearing this sort of case at court because the justice system has no power anyway. At least his partner in crime got 11 years in prison, but I am not sure that seems that much for shooting a police officer in the face! DB
  • Score: 0

12:47pm Mon 1 Jul 13

Hove Ex-Pat says...

I'm surprised that the judge did not give him "100 lines", "I promise not to get caught supplying drugs again".
The police must wonder why they bother at all.
Now if this pond life had nicked the judges car, he would have got 5yrs inside.
I'm surprised that the judge did not give him "100 lines", "I promise not to get caught supplying drugs again". The police must wonder why they bother at all. Now if this pond life had nicked the judges car, he would have got 5yrs inside. Hove Ex-Pat
  • Score: 0

1:54pm Mon 1 Jul 13

newsanalysis says...

I have studied the heroin condition for more than a decade, and watched the epidemic grow. Ten years ago I filmed a documentary called Hairkutt, it was called, "the best anti-drug message a cocky kid can watch" by the Boston Globe. I recently uploaded the 77 minute award winning film in its entirety on youtube as my contribution to stop this scourge.

Here is the link: http://www.youtube.c
om/watch?v=TJDgEOdjb
lA

If you have any questions feel free to contact me
Thanks
Curtis Elliott
I have studied the heroin condition for more than a decade, and watched the epidemic grow. Ten years ago I filmed a documentary called Hairkutt, it was called, "the best anti-drug message a cocky kid can watch" by the Boston Globe. I recently uploaded the 77 minute award winning film in its entirety on youtube as my contribution to stop this scourge. Here is the link: http://www.youtube.c om/watch?v=TJDgEOdjb lA If you have any questions feel free to contact me Thanks Curtis Elliott newsanalysis
  • Score: 0

2:51pm Mon 1 Jul 13

Steven007 says...

For this man to be given that he must be a grass or on the police pay role
For this man to be given that he must be a grass or on the police pay role Steven007
  • Score: 0

6:29pm Mon 1 Jul 13

Beverly RA says...

Case for the too lean sentence court I think. does this JUDGE not realise the devastation that this type of crime causes to families.Please come out from under your wig and into the real world.
Case for the too lean sentence court I think. does this JUDGE not realise the devastation that this type of crime causes to families.Please come out from under your wig and into the real world. Beverly RA
  • Score: 0

11:58am Tue 2 Jul 13

DB says...

Beverly RA wrote:
Case for the too lean sentence court I think. does this JUDGE not realise the devastation that this type of crime causes to families.Please come out from under your wig and into the real world.
Good comment.

I am actually hoping that the proposed enquiry into the lenient sentencing of Stuart Hall will actually prompt more public outcry at tiny punishments and hopefully will make judges think a bit more before handing down sentences that insult the victims and do not properly punish the perpetrators of crimes.

Judges themselves need to be subject to more responsibility. If this guy goes out and commits more crimes as a result of not being punished for his original ones, surely the judge should be held more personally responsible?
[quote][p][bold]Beverly RA[/bold] wrote: Case for the too lean sentence court I think. does this JUDGE not realise the devastation that this type of crime causes to families.Please come out from under your wig and into the real world.[/p][/quote]Good comment. I am actually hoping that the proposed enquiry into the lenient sentencing of Stuart Hall will actually prompt more public outcry at tiny punishments and hopefully will make judges think a bit more before handing down sentences that insult the victims and do not properly punish the perpetrators of crimes. Judges themselves need to be subject to more responsibility. If this guy goes out and commits more crimes as a result of not being punished for his original ones, surely the judge should be held more personally responsible? DB
  • Score: 0

1:31pm Tue 2 Jul 13

justbeinghonest says...

GRASS!
GRASS! justbeinghonest
  • Score: 0

9:27am Thu 4 Jul 13

Prince Philip says...

So many comments with so little to say.

Judges are independent and impartial. They are trained and professional. They hear the whole case - not just the bleeding chunks that make the news - and determine sentences on a broad range of considerations including, in this case, the young age of the man in the dock and the fact that his previous convictions were for possession, not supply.

If any reader feels that the sentence was unduly lenient, they can contact the Attorney General and ask him to apply to the Court of Appeal for a review. (Or they can just spout off on here, I suppose.)
So many comments with so little to say. Judges are independent and impartial. They are trained and professional. They hear the whole case - not just the bleeding chunks that make the news - and determine sentences on a broad range of considerations including, in this case, the young age of the man in the dock and the fact that his previous convictions were for possession, not supply. If any reader feels that the sentence was unduly lenient, they can contact the Attorney General and ask him to apply to the Court of Appeal for a review. (Or they can just spout off on here, I suppose.) Prince Philip
  • Score: 0

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