Richmond has London's lowest rate of child poverty

Richmond has the lowest child poverty rate in London, according to the Campaign to End Child Poverty.

Richmond’s rate of 7 per cent child poverty was the capital’s lowest, while Tower Hamlets, with 42 per cent, was highest.

Richmond was the only London borough to have a single figure score, with neighbour Kingston second at 11 per cent.

Within the borough, Heathfield ward had the worst child poverty rate with 21 per cent, followed by Ham, Petersham and Richmond Riverside with 16 per cent and Hampton North with 15 per cent.

Whitton had a 10 per cent rate, Mortlake and Barnes Common had 8 per cent, West Twickenham scored 7 per cent, North Richmond, Kew, Barnes and Hampton Wick had 6 per cent and Hampton had 5 per cent.

The remaining seven wards of the 18 had below 5 per cent child poverty rates.

Councillor Christine Percival, cabinet member for children’s services, said there had historically been five areas in the borough with greater rates of child poverty and, although the overall rate in Richmond was positive, the disparities needed to be addressed.

She said: “Half of the problem we have in Richmond is everyone thinks it’s such a rich borough we don’t have these problems, but we do.

“There’s a great need for help from some of these people. We are doing the best we can to try to rectify that situation.”

Councillor Suzette Nicholson, opposition spokesman for children’s services, said: “They might only be considered slightly deprived but it seems even more if you are next to people who are quite wealthy.

“I think one thing I feel the present council could do more is build some social housing.”

Comments (4)

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7:39pm Sun 24 Feb 13

Twickenham Bob says...

Many households are becoming food-insecure where they can no longer have access to a healthy diet.

This is a direct result of the governments ideologically driven cuts to the poorest households and their desire to punish the unemployed.

When you stop the benefits for an unemployed person for three months - often on very spurious grounds - how are they supposed to heat or put money in the meter on a freezing cold night?

Why do you think where there are high levels of poverty the crime rate is also higher?
Many households are becoming food-insecure where they can no longer have access to a healthy diet. This is a direct result of the governments ideologically driven cuts to the poorest households and their desire to punish the unemployed. When you stop the benefits for an unemployed person for three months - often on very spurious grounds - how are they supposed to heat or put money in the meter on a freezing cold night? Why do you think where there are high levels of poverty the crime rate is also higher? Twickenham Bob
  • Score: 0

1:12pm Mon 25 Feb 13

Twickenham resident says...

Twickenham Bob says "Many households are becomming food-insecure where they can no longer have access to a healthy diet."

Poppycock.

The trouble is many of those on benefits only buy turkey twizzlers and junk food, with a high fat content because they don't know how to cook because their parents don't know how to cook and their parents parents don't know how to cook.

Buying vegetables from a green grocers and fresh meat from the butcher actually costs less than the packaged rubbish they feed their children.

It is NOT expensive to eat healthy meals and there are plenty of cookery books available FREE at libraries which educate people on healthy inexpensive eating.

People have got fatter and less healthy since the arrival of pre packaged and junk food. Fact.
Twickenham Bob says "Many households are becomming food-insecure where they can no longer have access to a healthy diet." Poppycock. The trouble is many of those on benefits only buy turkey twizzlers and junk food, with a high fat content because they don't know how to cook because their parents don't know how to cook and their parents parents don't know how to cook. Buying vegetables from a green grocers and fresh meat from the butcher actually costs less than the packaged rubbish they feed their children. It is NOT expensive to eat healthy meals and there are plenty of cookery books available FREE at libraries which educate people on healthy inexpensive eating. People have got fatter and less healthy since the arrival of pre packaged and junk food. Fact. Twickenham resident
  • Score: 0

11:24pm Wed 27 Feb 13

Twickenham Bob says...

Twickenham Resident is displaying a classic example of completely-out-of-to
uch prejudice.

Last week we had a Tory Councillor stating there were under 1,500 Private rented homes in the borough when there are around 24,000.

This week we have the myth that people on benefits who have about £20 a most a week to spend on food, can afford to shop at the butchers and buy fresh fruit and vegetables.

The reality is those on benefits can only afford the cheapest and lowest quality white bread, and unhealthy margarine full of trans fats, with cheap and nasty reconstituted ham. Vegetables at best will be frozen, and the meat reconstituted scraps from ask-no-questions suppliers.

Cook a nice casserole they say - but how can you do that when you have to put money in the meter. Cooking something in the oven for an hour is an unaffordable luxury for those on benefits.

It is more expensive to eat healthy - there are dozens of well researched peer reviewed scientific papers on the subject.

The Faculty of Public Health - Royal College of Surgeons of the United Kingdom have a good briefing paper on the subject.

http://www.fph.org.u
k/uploads/bs_food_po
verty.pdf

Telegraph - rise in Children going to school hungry

http://www.telegraph
.co.uk/education/961
1257/School-breakfas
t-more-children-go-t
o-school-hungry.html
Twickenham Resident is displaying a classic example of completely-out-of-to uch prejudice. Last week we had a Tory Councillor stating there were under 1,500 Private rented homes in the borough when there are around 24,000. This week we have the myth that people on benefits who have about £20 a most a week to spend on food, can afford to shop at the butchers and buy fresh fruit and vegetables. The reality is those on benefits can only afford the cheapest and lowest quality white bread, and unhealthy margarine full of trans fats, with cheap and nasty reconstituted ham. Vegetables at best will be frozen, and the meat reconstituted scraps from ask-no-questions suppliers. Cook a nice casserole they say - but how can you do that when you have to put money in the meter. Cooking something in the oven for an hour is an unaffordable luxury for those on benefits. It is more expensive to eat healthy - there are dozens of well researched peer reviewed scientific papers on the subject. The Faculty of Public Health - Royal College of Surgeons of the United Kingdom have a good briefing paper on the subject. http://www.fph.org.u k/uploads/bs_food_po verty.pdf Telegraph - rise in Children going to school hungry http://www.telegraph .co.uk/education/961 1257/School-breakfas t-more-children-go-t o-school-hungry.html Twickenham Bob
  • Score: 0

11:30pm Wed 27 Feb 13

Twickenham Bob says...

UK charities are also going to the UN as they believe the Tory Government is breaching the United Nations Economic and Social Rights Convention.

With hundreds of thousands of Children turning up at school each day hungry as there parents cant afford to feed them - in the main due to benefit cuts - the UK is in clear breach of its international obligations.

http://www.guardian.
co.uk/society/2013/f
eb/18/food-poverty-u
k-human-rights-oblig
ations
UK charities are also going to the UN as they believe the Tory Government is breaching the United Nations Economic and Social Rights Convention. With hundreds of thousands of Children turning up at school each day hungry as there parents cant afford to feed them - in the main due to benefit cuts - the UK is in clear breach of its international obligations. http://www.guardian. co.uk/society/2013/f eb/18/food-poverty-u k-human-rights-oblig ations Twickenham Bob
  • Score: 0

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